• Get your Camino Frances Guidebook here.
  • For 2024 Pilgrims: €50,- donation = 1 year with no ads on the forum + 90% off any 2024 Guide. More here.
    (Discount code sent to you by Private Message after your donation)
  • ⚠️ Emergency contact in Spain - Dial 112 and AlertCops app. More on this here.

Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Summary of my little trip + some tips

Status
Not open for further replies.

Pirsing

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Planned Camino Frances/Ivierno (Sep 2022)
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.

Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

DON'T use books as guides. Use apps on your phone instead. Best apps are Camino Ninja and Wise Pilgrim variations. It's always updated, you have all the maps, gps, your current location, links to booking.com, all phone numbers, etc... and most importantly, less weight! We are in the future, and have a privilege to use this awesome technology, so don't miss it. Also upload your camino maps/gpx to your smartwatch if it supports maps.

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
 
Last edited:
A guide to speaking Spanish on the Camino - enrich your pilgrim experience.
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
Excellent summary. Thank you. Gracias.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
Just out of curiosity, what was your conclusion re: cash vs card?
 
Just out of curiosity, what was your conclusion re: cash vs card?
Oh, totally forgot about that. Thank you for reminding me.
Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.
I will add this to the main post.
 
Two days ago I finished my Camino
Overall I liked your post. It showed that not much is needed to walk though preferably I like to tailor my advice (I try to remember to call it suggestions).

About your mention of old people on the last 100km, during the summer when classes were out there were hordes of students walking. I remember them mostly walking in larger groups, so maybe it would be just as hard starting a conversation as with the grumps [apparently unfriendly older folks] you mentioned.

Edit: @Pirsing didn't mention grumps in his post above. He is unfairly being criticized for it below. I'ved edited above too.
 
Last edited:
Join our full-service guided tour and let us convert you into a Pampered Pilgrim!
hordes of students walking
When i was walking from SdC to airport, i saw like a 42 milions of kids with camino tshirts and small backpacks. I didn’t even understand if it was the pilgrims or some kind of walk from school to Santiago.
 
When i was walking from SdC to airport, i saw like a 42 milions of kids with camino tshirts and small backpacks. I didn’t even understand if it was the pilgrims or some kind of walk from school to Santiago.

They can be both. Schoolchildren on a pilgrimage. Afterall it is " their backgarden ".Would be a pity if they would not grasp the opportunity to undertake their local pilgrimage.
 
When i was walking from SdC to airport, i saw like a 42 milions of kids with camino tshirts and small backpacks. I didn’t even understand if it was the pilgrims or some kind of walk from school to Santiago.
I could never walk the distances that you walk and if we ever meet I will wave as you go on by. I think most of your observations are correct but there are preferences and budgets for different pilgrims. I never walk in "high" season for exactly the reasons you mentioned. I would suggest that you walk some different caminos in the future if you have the opportunity. If you have more time in the future maybe you may want to walk shorter distances to enjoy the beauty around you. May I suggest three caminos to you. One I have not walked but know many who have. The Norte, Le Puy in France and the Primitivo. All three are more physically challenging than the CF (although based on what you have written i doubt any would present major challenges to you. I have not walked the Primitivo but I know and have read from many that it is the hardest as well as the most beautiful of the "major" routes. I have walked the other two. The Norte has absolutely beautiful and breathtaking coastlines to walk along and see. Le Puy has a great variety of beautiful landscapes. I can guarantee you that you will want to buy lunch so you can sit and have a nice homemade pilgrim feast listening and watching waves crashing to the shore as you sit on a rock high above or in a beautiful forest in France eating their awesome bread, cheeses and other goodies.
L'shana tova.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I think your
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.

Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
I think your comments on language say a lot more about you than the Spanish people. There is no onus on them to speak your language - the onus is on you to speak theirs. Anything else is a bonus.
 
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.

Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
I was very interested in your comments on your experience on the Camino. I was slightly taken aback by the vitupritive nature of your criticism of the locals. You are in Spain. In Spain we speak Spanish. In the larger cities you will encounter more people (mostly younger) who will have a working knowledge of English. However the beauty of the Camino is that it takes us through very beautiful rural parts of the country. Did it never occur to you to take the trouble to learn a little bit of basic Spanish. "Busco una tienda telefonica de Orange o Vodafone." It's 8 words. In addition a few basic words for food and drink and a couple of phrases for directions are easy and useful. Otherwise your comments are great, Regarding bed bugs, just take your own sleeping bag.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Nice summary if YOUR Camino! Two comments as
I have been on 4 Camino at different ages! 1. Boots vs trail runners us a very personal decision. I use light boots because trail runners hit me in the ankle (ouch!!) and have never had a blister. 2. It’s Spain. People speak Spanish. Download a translation app so you can converse in their native language. And don’t be afraid to speak Spanish badly! They appreciate the effort. 3. Old folks? You mean pilgrims or locals?? I’m an old folk (60s) and most of my friends are in their 20s. I don’t think they consider me grumpy!! Ageism is a thing if you make it a thing.
 
just take your own sleeping bag
Thats one of my things in backpack i never used 🤣

About a language. First thing, all my life I recognized English as an international language. In Israel all people know English and it's hard for me to imagine that in some countries a big part of people doesn't know it.
Second, if someone does not understand the language I speak, I will stop speaking that language and try to speak another language or by hands, and not just blindly continue to speak the same language. 🤷‍♂️
 
I don’t think they consider me grumpy!! Ageism is a thing if you make it a thing.
I dont said that all old people are grumpy. 🤦‍♂️
I said that specific people i met was very old and grumpy.
Please read carefully.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
little English in the French countryside
Its ok. Little English is enough.
One of my camino friends started in Le Puy and he said he never had a problem with comunication in France. He is only English speaker (from US).
 
Its ok. Little English is enough.
One of my camino friends started in Le Puy and he said he never had a problem with comunication in France. He is only English speaker (from US).
You mentioned how you trained with a lot of walking, I commend you as I was never able to fit in that much walking before my Caminos. However I found these short podcasts very useful as I practice walked what I could.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people.
I guess we all have different experiences. I can't speak much Spanish apart from asking for a tortilla and beer!:) However I never had an issue, even met a local guy that asked if I spoke English or German as he wanted to practice, in my case, English. We walked together for an hour or so, one of many highlights of my journey.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I wear Goretex boots, (4 Caminos so far) but have never gotten a blister. My feet hate trail runners as they just make my feet ache horribly, in fact so bad that I cannot sleep, but I would never tell someone else not to wear them.
I enjoyed the walk after Sarria, seeing the joy that people had that have finally made it here. Maybe they saved for years to make it this far, maybe it took all of their courage to go on a trip this far from home to do something they had never done before.

Your post made me sad. Really sad. Most of the posts on this forum are encouraging, and positive and it is why I enjoy coming here so much. Yours was the opposite.
Hope your next Camino is more fun.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.

Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
We finished or 3rd Frances camino on Monday. Absolutely, train, train and train and use the shoes you will wear on the camino. Only one of our group of five got blisters. He purchased his shoes two weeks before we left. It was more crowded from Sarria but the group spreads out quickly. I am 75 and my husband 71. We would like to not be included as one of the "grumpy old people."
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
About language...I speak passable Spanish. I live in Mexico. The Spaniards I ran into had no problem understanding me. My problem was I often couldn't understand what they were saying to me. The Spanish you learned in school is very different than the Galician dialect. I had to re-learn Spanish when I moved to Mexico, and in certain regions, I have the same problem, especially if people speak fast. I simply ask: "mas despacio por favor" (more slowly please). It often helps.
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
My experience was very different. I always make an attempt to speak Portuguese or Spanish. A dozen simple terms. Hello, thank you, where is, etc. the conversation inevitably turned to English. I suspect you were being taught a lesion. A little humility goes a long way.
 
Not to be rude - you’re in Spain that’s why they speak Spanish. I’m an old lady who has traveled to 85 countries. I speak only English. I studied Spanish for one year on line from a community college. I hate computers!! I’m doing my first serious hiking in my life. I started walking and exercising two years ago - I’m only out 4 days - Pamplona. I love these people they’re incredibly friendly and I’m in tears the countryside is sooooooo beautiful. All I can say - a completely different experience than yours. Oh and for ANYBODY who believes you can come out here without walking and hiking beforehand- mmmmm might wanna think again. It’s doable but it’s a workout even if you go slow (which I do). Buen Camino!!
 
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.

Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
Es Espana. Por eso Harlan Espanol!!!!!
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Transport luggage-passengers.
From airports to SJPP
Luggage from SJPP to Roncevalles
I think your

I think your comments on language say a lot more about you than the Spanish people. There is no onus on them to speak your language - the onus is on you to speak theirs. Anything else is a bonus.
I agree... A little humility goes a long way.

I speak few words of Spanish/Espanol, and I can recall only two occasions in three caminos when I was made to feel uncomfortable for being unable to converse in spanish - once by a very bored young lady taking my booking in an albergue and the other by a pair of American pilgrims when I was trying to order an orange juice.

I found that "No hablo español - may we speak English?" worked wonders...

My unsolicited advice - accept your Camino for what it is - if you want it to be 'just like home', then maybe staying home is the best option...
 
Thank you for sharing your experience. I visit this forum now and then to get a little taste of the Camino. It was wonderful to read your fun post and I'm sure many future walkers visiting this forum for some inkling of what to expect will appreciate your fresh perspective having just finished two days ago.

I think you will find less English on the Le Puy route, but you never know. I used the translation app on my phone all of the time. Whenever I try to speak Spanish or French, the people I am speaking to usually respond, "I don't speak English." :) Wishing you many, many more wonderful Caminos. Good luck with your studies.
 
>> I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week,
Do I understand correctly that you did 50-90km in one walk? Or is this your weekly distance?
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Do I understand correctly that you did 50-90km in one walk?
Yes. Once a week I did a walking of 50 - 90km. It takes me between 9 and 17 hours. Depends on how many stops I did. In that day usualy Im not doing my other trainings like running, boxing, cycling, swimming or gym. I posted my Garmin statistics before in some post, you can check there. Soon I will buy new Garmin watch, so I can upload more detailed long walks, because my old watch battery dies after 50 - 55 km of walking (VivoActive3).
 
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.

Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

DON'T use books as guides. Use apps on your phone instead. Best apps are Camino Ninja and Wise Pilgrim variations. It's always updated, you have all the maps, gps, your current location, links to booking.com, all phone numbers, etc... and most importantly, less weight! We are in the future, and have a privilege to use this awesome technology, so don't miss it. Also upload your camino maps/gpx to your smartwatch if it supports maps.

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
Hi, speedy walker! Thanks for reporting back on the question of the need for cash rather than card. Most of your tips are not useful for me, but clearly served you well. I have a very different experience regarding the ability of the local people I meet and their knowledge of English, especially young people. I have learned Spanish though. That really helps. Not perfect, but very functional. Try it, for your next, longer walk.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Might I gently point out that it is a little incongruous of you to complain that the Spanish do not speak a language foreign to both of you yet you don't seem to have learnt any of theirs. My own experience is that many people in Spain do speak English, especially younger people (it is now taught well in schools) especially in hospitality and especially along the camino. Spain is a fascinating country if you take the time to appreciate it while you are there and learn a little about it
 
The best disclaimer (as far as distances, footwear, guide books, route taken, and pack size) is YMMV.
What you did worked for you, but might not work for others - and vice versa.
Some people like boots, some don't.
Some need bigger packs and do well with them, some don't.
Some like the social aspect of a busy camino, others abhor it.
Some prefer books, others go completely digital.
And so on ad infinitum.

But about language? That's not so relative.
We walk in Spain. People speak Castilian there. Complaining that they do otherwise is a recipe for suffering, on so many levels. It's up to us to learn their language, not the other way around.
What's going on in their heads?
What's going on in yours? Probably about the same thing, just using Castilian words. 🙃
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues.

You walked a Camino, yes, but you did not take time to enjoy your Camino, you did not smell the roses.

Walking a Camino is certainly not a contest of walking the longest distances; walking a Camino is taking time for introspection, meditation while walking, meeting other people, enjoying your 'Camino-family': people from all over the world you meet every now and then again and again in an albergue, during a dinner, drinking a coffee or a wine. With your speed you never meet people again during your Camino.

Well, this was your Camino, mine were different to say the least. And I remember all the towns and albergues ....
 
Agree. And language knowledge does not affect it.
And Im not complaining. I just wrote my experience. The most important aspect for me in the whole Camino is walking/hiking in the nature. Other just a minor things that i dont care much about...
"Other just a minor things that i dont care much about."

You said it.
 
Join our full-service guided tour of the Basque Country and let us pamper you!
My Camino was best trip of my life. I can not imagine something better than this. Hmm... Actually i can, a trip like this but a much longer. Too bad im studying right now. Just want to walk forever.

It is a pity you did not say this first!!! From your first post it seemed like it was not a positive experience.

For me the Camino only gets better and better, the more times I do it. The Camino will still be there when you finish studying. One of the reasons you will find "old ppl" is that for some of us we have to wait until we are retired before we have the time to walk a long Camino.
 
I sp
You walked a Camino, yes, but you did not take time to enjoy your Camino, you did not smell the roses.

Walking a Camino is certainly not a contest of walking the longest distances; walking a Camino is taking time for introspection, meditation while walking, meeting other people, enjoying your 'Camino-family': people from all over the world you meet every now and then again and again in an albergue, during a dinner, drinking a coffee or a wine. With your speed you never meet people again during your Camino.

Well, this was your Camino, mine were different to say the least. And I remember all the towns and albergues ....
These aspects of the Camino are important and meaningful to you, but thankfully, we are all different and get to experience the Camino (and life) in our own ways. 😊

@Pirsing really seemed to get his joy from the act simple of walking.
 
I don't know where to start with comments, as I have so many.

You seem to have done the Camino that you wanted, so congratulations for that.
It is a pity you did not say this first!!! From your first post it seemed like it was not a positive experience.

For me the Camino only gets better and better, the more times I do it. The Camino will still be there when you finish studying. One of the reasons you will find "old ppl" is that for some of us we have to wait until we are retired before we have the time to walk a long Camino.
While I disagree with a lot of the original posting, notably the “why don’t they speak English” stuff, I do think it’s perfectly fine to walk the Camino at whatever pace feels right for each individual. I am an “aged” 61 and will finish tomorrow in 25 days as I did 8 years ago. Personally I have little interest in being part of a “Camino family”. Despite my relatively faster speed I regularly see other similar pace people across the 3 1/2 weeks. Each to his own…….
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Yes. Once a week I did a walking of 50 - 90km. It takes me between 9 and 17 hours. Depends on how many stops I did. In that day usualy Im not doing my other trainings like running, boxing, cycling, swimming or gym. I posted my Garmin statistics before in some post, you can check there. Soon I will buy new Garmin watch, so I can upload more detailed long walks, because my old watch battery dies after 50 - 55 km of walking (VivoActive3).
If you are happy with the Garmin apps and web fitness tracking, have a look at the Garmin Instinct Solar - I have one and it gives about 4 weeks normal use or 35 hours when GPS tracking an activity.
>
 
Last edited:
If you are happy with the Garmin apps and web fitness tracking, have a look at the Garmin Instinct Solar - I have one and it gives about 4 weeks normal use or 35 hours when GPS tracking an activity.
>
I hope it goes without saying that for most people, following Pirsing’s training method is a recipe for disaster. That wd be like training for a marathon by running more than a marathon once every week. Injury guaranteed unless you are Superman.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Did you even try to speak Spanish? This entire paragraph makes me cringe. It seems like you have the language problem, not the Spaniards (in Spain).
 
Two days ago I finished my Camino (Ponferrada ->SdC -> Finisterre -> SdC -> Airport). Did it in 10 days. In total it was like 440 km. I did some training before camino, so this pace/km per day was good for me.

Where I stayed? I don't remember almost all the towns and albergues names. I just walked, and when it was 3pm+ I started to look around for albergues. Started walking each day about 6:30 am.

Before my flight i took 300 euros, and when i came back, i had 204 euros. I saw only one place that dont accept card. A few places preferred cash, so i payed with cash. Most places accept cards. I think in few years all places will accept cards.

Language problems. I dont know why, but NOBODY speaks english in Spain, even young people. When I arrived in SdC (for the first time before the camino), I loooked for mobile provider store (like Orange or Vodafone), and I was asking people on the streets if they speak english for 2 HOURS! before i found some english speaking guy that helped me to find an Orange store. When i told people I dont speak spanish, they continued to speak to me in spanish, and again when I said "no spanish, only english", they continued to speak spanish. What's going on in their heads? They think that if they keep talking in spanish, i'll suddenly start to understand them? 🤣 In albergues, at reception/bar/owner AFTER the Sarria people understand a little bit english so I was happy about that.

Tips: Do training before camino. Just walk a lot. I did 50 - 90 km of walking each training session once a week, and the camino was very easy for me.

Avoid at all cost Sarria-SdC, just take another route. Overcrowded with groups of very old ppl, that doesn't even speak to you. I Buen Caminoed to them, and they just looked at me with a grumpy face like "wtf you want from us, keep going". Or if you want to do Sarria-SdC, just stay in rural places, not in Sarria, Portomarin etc...

DON'T use books as guides. Use apps on your phone instead. Best apps are Camino Ninja and Wise Pilgrim variations. It's always updated, you have all the maps, gps, your current location, links to booking.com, all phone numbers, etc... and most importantly, less weight! We are in the future, and have a privilege to use this awesome technology, so don't miss it. Also upload your camino maps/gpx to your smartwatch if it supports maps.

Don't bring more than 1 pair of walking shoes. You don't need it. Bring 1 pair for walking shoes, and flip flops for staying in albergues.

Don't bring hiking boots. Bring a trail runner. It's 2022 now, not 1980. All the pilgrims I met with hiking boots were with a lot of blisters, and ppl with trail runners were happy without blisters at all. DON'T use gore tex trail runners! If it will be raining, your feet will be wet after 2-3 of raining in gore tex, but it will take way more time to dry them than non gore tex shoes.

Use a backpack not bigger than 30 litres. I saw people carrying backpacks 50 litres+ and complaining about its weight and how their knees are hurting. I used a 28 litres backpack and it was bigger than I needed. It was 4 kg (without water) and there were a few things/clothes that i didn't use at all. My next Camino (Le Puy -> SdC) I will use a 20 litres backpack with 3kg of stuff.

Don't plan anything and just walk. Book your albergue ONLY if you arrive in the evening, after 7pm. But if you walk in not popular season like winter, I think it's better to book your bed.

Don't bring food with you. There are a lot of places to eat on the camino. Only bring some sweet bonbons/fruits if you have diabetes and have blood sugar problems.

Two things about how to choose your bed: look for bed bugs and private sockets.

If you feel like you need more than 8 hours of sleep, take a rest day/zero day. Listen to your body.

You can walk from SdC to the airport. It's 12km, just do it like google maps shows you.

I think that's all. If I remember something, I will add it to this post.

Buen Camino.
You did forget the most important thing. Number one rule for the Camino is to learn some Spanish. It’s also all the rules through to about ten. Most Caminos involve a bit of planning over time and it shouldn’t be beyond reason to devote a bit every day or so to have enough to get by. It shows respect and after all it’s their country.

De Colores

Bogong
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Join our full-service guided tour of the Basque Country and let us pamper you!
Status
Not open for further replies.

Most read last week in this forum

La Voz de Galicia has reported the death of a 65 year old pilgrim from the United States this afternoon near Castromaior. The likely cause appears to be a heart attack. The pilgrim was walking the...
Just reading this thread https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/news-from-the-camino.86228/ and the OP mentions people being fined €12000. I knew that you cannot do the Napoleon in...
This is my first posting but as I look at the Camino, I worry about 'lack of solitude' given the number of people on the trail. I am looking to do the France route....as I want to have the...
The Burguete bomberos had another busy day yesterday. Picking up two pilgrims with symptoms of hypothermia and exhaustion near the Lepoeder pass and another near the Croix de Thibault who was...
I’m heading to the Frances shortly and was going to be a bit spontaneous with rooms. I booked the first week just to make sure and was surprised at how tight reservations were. As I started making...
My first SPRINGTIME days on the Camino Francés 🎉 A couple of interesting tidbits. I just left Foncebadón yesterday. See photo. By the way, it's really not busy at all on my "wave". Plenty of...

❓How to ask a question

How to post a new question on the Camino Forum.

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

This site is run by Ivar at

in Santiago de Compostela.
This site participates in the Amazon Affiliate program, designed to provide a means for Ivar to earn fees by linking to Amazon
Official Camino Passport (Credential) | 2024 Camino Guides
Back
Top