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What is Your Average Walking Distance per Day?

What is your average walking distance per day on the Camino Frances?

  • Under 10 kms (Under 6.2 miles)

    Votes: 1 0.4%
  • 10 - 15.9 kms (6.2 to 9.9 miles)

    Votes: 19 6.9%
  • 16 - 20.9 kms (9.9 to 13 miles)

    Votes: 58 20.9%
  • 21 - 25.9 kms (13 to 16.1 miles)

    Votes: 121 43.7%
  • 26 - 30.9 kms (16.2 to 19.2 miles)

    Votes: 50 18.1%
  • 31 - 35.9 kms (19.3 to 22.3 miles)

    Votes: 19 6.9%
  • 36 - 40.9 kms (22.4 to 25.4 miles)

    Votes: 7 2.5%
  • 41 - 45.9 kms (25.5 to 28.5 miles)

    Votes: 2 0.7%
  • Over 46 kms (Over 28.6 miles)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    277
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
There have been a few new Pilgrims on the forum recently who seem worried about the distance they 'have' to walk each day. Of course the daily distance is a totally personal thing.

So as to make this poll as scientific as possible, this Poll relates to the Camino Frances only and during good weather. i.e. not a Winter Camino.

What would you estimate is your 'average' distance walked per day? I'll kick off. Mine is only 21 kms :oops:

Some like to walk long and some like to walk short......... ;)

Don't include non walking / rest days
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Mine comes out to about 26, which is a surprise, as there have been short days too--because of injury or whatever. Short in my case being anything under 20. Go with the flow and it all averages out, literally and figuratively.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Not that it matters one bit........ but it will be interesting to see what the 'average' is. I'm betting about 26 kms... ;)

Actually it might be less than that. Just using the Brierley stages the average is 23.7 I thought it would be higher.
 
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Oravasaari

Helsinki, Finland
Year of past OR future Camino
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
Mine is over 30km/d on 2 caminos but there were short days (20km or less) a few times due to hot weather, feeling a bit under par or just getting that feeling that a place was the right place to stop even though not "planned" the night before. Sometimes I am surprised how far I've walked before noon and other times I say to myself " Only 12km? That felt like 20km!". The beauty of the Frances is you can set off every day without a plan and simply stop when you want to.
 

Playful Dread

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Portuguese Way (Porto - Santiago - Finisterre) June/July 2015
Portuguese Way (Lisbon - Santiago - Finisterre) May/June 2017
I've not walked the French so I've refrained from adding my vote to the poll.

But on the Portuguese Coastal I probably averaged about 21km as well. I had just over 3 weeks, so plenty of time to reach Santiago plus it was my honeymoon so I was in no rush to be honest!
It was also my first time doing any long walking since having my feet operated on 18 months previous. So i was really pleased with my daily average.

Slightly different this year mind you and i think that will increase a little when i walk from Lisbon to Santiago along the coast.
 
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Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Again, soon as possible!
My average works out at 22km a day. Some longer days (up to 34km), and some short days (down to 15km).
 

Fletchonides

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP - Pamplona (2014)
Pamplona - Burgos (2016)
Burgos - Leon (June 2017)
Leon - SdC (June 2018)
I would vary between 20 and 30km per day. 25km would be the sustainable distance, towards 30km and I feel like its too much and I am building up problems for the next days. Average would be about 24kms.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Actually it might be less than that. Just using the Brierley stages the average is 23.7 I thought it would be higher.
I thought it was higher than that as well. But I first walked from SJPP to SDC in 32 days, about 25 km/day, so it has to be a little less than 25 km/day if one follows Brierley's 33 day pattern.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I would vary between 20 and 30km per day. 25km would be the sustainable distance, towards 30km and I feel like its too much and I am building up problems for the next days. Average would be about 24kms.

I can relate to that. A 30+ day would take me a few days to 'get over' by walking shorter days.
 

Magwood

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
See signature line for links to daily posts to blogs from many caminos
Over four different camino routes, including the Frances, I have consistently averaged 27 km per day - by chance rather than design.
 
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Chuck Cunningham

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Starting April, 15, 2017
Y'all are too much. This poll makes me really wonder about myself. I have been doing 3-5 mile warm up hikes and that seems to be enough. LOL I hope i can , like some suggest, find my "legs" on the camino. A longggg time ago when I hiked the AT i remember it took me a while to get working/hiking properly,where I was comfortable and not grunting and groaning, but once i fell into a groove it seemed like i was almost riding a walking machine. I loved it. They say on the AT that it takes about 30 days to find your stride. Thank God I have my flights booked 90 days apart so i am in no rush at ALL. I thoroughly intend to enjoy it, not rush it nor avoid all pain if possible. The last has always been one of my goals in life. LOL
 

Rhun Leeding

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Leon to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2015
Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
. Mine is only 21 kms :oops:

There is no "only" required in that sentence! Whatever your average is - as long as its the right average for a comfortable and enjoyable camino for you, then what's the difference?

Mine also comes out around the same. Depending on albergues I'd usually find my range somewhere between 15-18 up to around 25-27 at a push. Personally, my range is also limited by my mindset, as I find on those stages where people can do longer distances, usually long flat days, I get bored and my mind wanders back to my aching feet, whereas plenty of climbing distracts me and means I don't really tend to go any faster on the flat days.

Chuck - are you starting from SJPP or further out? I've always (or at least, in the two or three years since I became a camino convert) wanted to go from Le Puy...but work is yet to agree for paid leave for several months off!
 

Chuck Cunningham

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Starting April, 15, 2017
There is no "only" required in that sentence! Whatever your average is - as long as its the right average for a comfortable and enjoyable camino for you, then what's the difference?

Mine also comes out around the same. Depending on albergues I'd usually find my range somewhere between 15-18 up to around 25-27 at a push. Personally, my range is also limited by my mindset, as I find on those stages where people can do longer distances, usually long flat days, I get bored and my mind wanders back to my aching feet, whereas plenty of climbing distracts me and means I don't really tend to go any faster on the flat days.

Chuck - are you starting from SJPP or further out? I've always (or at least, in the two or three years since I became a camino convert) wanted to go from Le Puy...but work is yet to agree for paid leave for several months off!

Yes, I am starting from Le Puy. Too bad you weren't hiking this year.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Mine comes out to about 26, which is a surprise, as there have been short days too--because of injury or whatever. Short in my case being anything under 20. Go with the flow and it all averages out, literally and figuratively.

Same, which surprised me too! :)
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
I think that the AT is harder than the Camino - I am not surprised to hear that it takes a month to find one's stride on the AT - you have lots of gear, you have to camp out, etc. On the Camino, the vast majority of people carry less than 20lbs and sleep in a regular bed every night. You also stop in cafes along the way and there is a beer (or wine) waiting for you at the end of every day if you want it. That makes things a lot easier to get used to.
 
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Chuck Cunningham

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Starting April, 15, 2017
Soun
We are from Aus and will probably take longer than most to do the Frances (we are travelling before hand in Germany). The Spanish consulate has advised that we can apply to a local police station to extend our stay beyond the normal 90/180 day thing but can't guarantee that this will be granted and the extra time can only be spent in Spain. This should work for us.....
Sounds very good. Thanks man
 

Chuck Cunningham

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Starting April, 15, 2017
I think that the AT is harder than the Camino - I am not surprised to hear that it takes a month to find one's stride on the AT - you have lots of gear, you have to camp out, etc. On the Camino, the vast majority of people carry less than 20lbs and sleep in a regular bed every night. You also stop in cafes along the way and there is a beer (or wine) waiting for you at the end of every day if you want it. That makes things a lot easier to get used to.
Not to mention carry and cook your own food, additional 8-10 lbs. Hike and sleep out in all kinds of weather. My first AT hike in '93 I and several others were caught in a almost total white out blizzard in the Smokey Mountains for 5 days. We had to hike out anyway... were running out of food.. we would stay at a blaze and send one guy out to find the next blaze...all walk there and then send the point man out again,,, we made it out in pretty good shape but no one in our group could tell you what the Smokeys looked like.
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
Not to mention carry and cook your own food, additional 8-10 lbs. Hike and sleep out in all kinds of weather. My first AT hike in '93 I and several others were caught in a almost total white out blizzard in the Smokey Mountains for 5 days. We had to hike out anyway... were running out of food.. we would stay at a blaze and send one guy out to find the next blaze...all walk there and then send the point man out again,,, we made it out in pretty good shape but no one in our group could tell you what the Smokeys looked like.
I'm impressed. I'll tell our scouts this story. (I'm an asst. Scout Master.)
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Year of past OR future Camino
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Y'all are too much. This poll makes me really wonder about myself. I have been doing 3-5 mile warm up hikes and that seems to be enough. LOL I hope i can , like some suggest, find my "legs" on the camino. A longggg time ago when I hiked the AT i remember it took me a while to get working/hiking properly,where I was comfortable and not grunting and groaning, but once i fell into a groove it seemed like i was almost riding a walking machine. I loved it. They say on the AT that it takes about 30 days to find your stride. Thank God I have my flights booked 90 days apart so i am in no rush at ALL. I thoroughly intend to enjoy it, not rush it nor avoid all pain if possible. The last has always been one of my goals in life. LOL
I was amazed how I myself got into a fair rythm within a mere 3 day period. I am a standard walker and walk to work, nightshifting with days interval. I walked 25 K a day.
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
For the answer, I assumed a clear, dry but overcast day, of about 60 degrees (F) or about 15 C. I further assumed more or less rolling or level grades, with no head wind. In other words, perfect walking conditions.

If you add, wind, rain or snow, the distances will decline. Include mud, and the distances drop further.

Similarly, I walk much slower in hot, sunny or humid conditions than in cooler or cloudy conditions to avoid dehydration. Also, I take more breaks to cool off.

So, the "correct" answer is "it very much depends..."

My hourly walking speed is from 3 kph to 5 kph, depending on weather and terrain. Using a 6-hour walking day, exclusive of break times, this works to a range of 18 to about 30 kilometers.

As the adverts for autos say, your mileage may vary...
 

RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Year of past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
2003 , my first real Camino - 25km per day + excursions - every Camino after that 5km - 18km max per day ............ soo much better - sometimes even carrying a tent.
 

Magnara

Maggie Ramsay
Year of past OR future Camino
Santiago de Compostela (2005) Via Francigena (2010) Le Puy to St Jean (2014)
There have been a few new Pilgrims on the forum recently who seem worried about the distance they 'have' to walk each day. Of course the daily distance is a totally personal thing.

So as to make this poll as scientific as possible, this Poll relates to the Camino Frances only and during good weather. i.e. not a Winter Camino.

What would you estimate is your 'average' distance walked per day? I'll kick off. Mine is only 21 kms :oops:

Some like to walk long and some like to walk short......... ;)

Don't include non walking / rest days

Our shorter walking days (15 - 20 km per day) have paid off for us during three caminos and (like the turtle and the hare) we often see pilgrims with injuries who have tried to go faster and further each day than is right for their body , so they are laid up to recover, or worse, are having to abandon their camino altogether. But as the saying goes, it's horses for courses, and some pilgrims seem to happily cover amazing distances day after day with no ill effects.
 

Gromit

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Did Camino Frances from August to October 2017
Y'all are too much. This poll makes me really wonder about myself. I have been doing 3-5 mile warm up hikes and that seems to be enough. LOL I hope i can , like some suggest, find my "legs" on the camino. A longggg time ago when I hiked the AT i remember it took me a while to get working/hiking properly,where I was comfortable and not grunting and groaning, but once i fell into a groove it seemed like i was almost riding a walking machine. I loved it. They say on the AT that it takes about 30 days to find your stride. Thank God I have my flights booked 90 days apart so i am in no rush at ALL. I thoroughly intend to enjoy it, not rush it nor avoid all pain if possible. The last has always been one of my goals in life. LOL
Hi Chuck- my husband and I are starting out on Camino Francis from St Jean on 27 August. I am doing it for my 70th birthday. We are fit (for our age) but are planning to average 18 kms per day. Our biggest day will be 27 km. We want to have time to get into the history and the culture and explore the villages. We intend to walk 43 days and have 8 rest days. You will be fine. Just keep walking but don't overdo the training. Our training strategy is to do 2 or 3 walks a week and increase the length by 1 km per walk per week. We started at 5 km per walk and we are now up to 20 km per walk. Good luck.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Muxia-Fisterra 2017
Portuguese 2018, Catalan 2019, (Mozarabe-VdlP-Sanabres-Ingles, 2021)
I completed two weeks ago, and I planned for 24 Kms (15 miles per day) based on the Brierley stages, but in the end I did 30 kms per day, and fitted in SDC - Muxia - Fisterra in the time I had originally allocated for CF. So, I covered 1000 kms in 33 days. On my return home, my wife asked me why I had rushed it, but honestly, I never felt that I was rushing it. I was just enjoying the experience SO MUCH that I couldn't stop, and I took no break days, as I didn't want them. I made loads of new friends, saw all the high points and thoroughly enjoyed the beautiful panoramas, and never felt that I had skimped anything. A truly wonderful experience that I will cherish forever. CP next year!!
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I completed two weeks ago, and I planned for 24 Kms (15 miles per day) based on the Brierley stages, but in the end I did 30 kms per day, and fitted in SDC - Muxia - Fisterra in the time I had originally allocated for CF. So, I covered 1000 kms in 33 days. On my return home, my wife asked me why I had rushed it, but honestly, I never felt that I was rushing it. I was just enjoying the experience SO MUCH that I couldn't stop, and I took no break days, as I didn't want them. I made loads of new friends, saw all the high points and thoroughly enjoyed the beautiful panoramas, and never felt that I had skimped anything. A truly wonderful experience that I will cherish forever. CP next year!!

Sounds like you had a great time. I 'needed' rest days, but hated taking them. I would pace around the place looking longingly at yellow arrows......... :oops:
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Frances (2016)
Camino Frances (2017)
Caminho Português (2018)
VDLP 2019
I find Naismith's rule helps as a general guide to calculate the next days goal. 'On relatively flat terrain, hiker being of reasonable fitness, and under normal conditions. Allow 1 hour for every 3 mi (5 km) forward, plus 1 hour for every 2000 ft (600 m) of ascent. This of course does not take into account sightseeing or extended rest stops etc. I take plenty of these and so my average on the camino is about 25 kms per day. That being said, one of the most important lessons in hiking is to learn to walk at your own pace.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Sounds like you had a great time. I 'needed' rest days, but hated taking them. I would pace around the place looking longingly at yellow arrows......... :oops:
I took one rest day last year, and don't plan to take any this year. I may just walk a couple of short days in a row if I feel like I need a rest.
 

Hermes

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino de Frances (2016)
I'm following Brierley's route (from afar right now) for the Camino Portuguese and he's clicked off 30+km every day for the first seven days. Day eight is 29. :confused:. I've had to come up with my own route and am two days behind his already. Not a problem, but with less places to stay coming out of Lisbon..long walks seem to be the nature of things.

I walked the Frances in July of 2016 and averaged around 20km per day. That was perfect. We will see how it goes!
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
As said above, the distance average per day is relative to the person walking. Your age, fitness level, pack size will play apart in what you can do. Likewise the route taken, weather, terrain, distance between accomodation also come into play. Time is often a major driver, how much time off work / on the road can you afford.

But perhaps the biggest factor is your motivation, do you want to stroll along smell the flowers and drink wine with fellow travelers then a short spell on the CF doing 10 to 15kms is probably lovely. But if you want to test your limits and revel in splendid isolation then slogging out over 30kms a day on the Levante or VdlP is another's idea of a good time.
 
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Hermes

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino de Frances (2016)
I think another factor is whether or not it is your very first Camino. Second and so on gives you a better sense of pack weight, what you need, your desires, etc. First one out is another story.
 

Gesha

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
"May 2014" & "May 2015"
Y'all are too much. This poll makes me really wonder about myself. I have been doing 3-5 mile warm up hikes and that seems to be enough. LOL I hope i can , like some suggest, find my "legs" on the camino. A longggg time ago when I hiked the AT i remember it took me a while to get working/hiking properly,where I was comfortable and not grunting and groaning, but once i fell into a groove it seemed like i was almost riding a walking machine. I loved it. They say on the AT that it takes about 30 days to find your stride. Thank God I have my flights booked 90 days apart so i am in no rush at ALL. I thoroughly intend to enjoy it, not rush it nor avoid all pain if possible. The last has always been one of my goals in life. LOL
Hi, I never train by walking before my 3 Camino’s as I get my legs once I start. The first weeks are shorter and slower until I get strong. I just completed Paris to Santiago in 71 days which is an average of just over 31kms per day according to the Camino office. My calculation was 26.5kms per day which was about right. I started out walking around 20 per day & ended walking 40’s. Whatever you do, enjoy, it’s not s race unless your time poor.
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
I'm following Brierley's route (from afar right now) for the Camino Portuguese and he's clicked off 30+km every day for the first seven days. Day eight is 29. :confused:. I've had to come up with my own route and am two days behind his already.

Brierley's approach of dividing routes into daily stages can cause problems. I have met a number of people who were walking the Caminos as their first experience of long-distance walking. With little prior knowledge of their own walking style and ability to base their decisions upon they have assumed - quite reasonably - that as the most popular English-language guide Brierley's stages must be the norm and quite practical. Often people commit themselves to the Brierley stages in advance by pre-booking accommodation along the way and booking their transport home accordingly with little room for flexibility. If they then find it impossible to keep up with Brierley's daily pattern they are forced to choose from unpalatable options: either skip sections of the route or slow down, walk only part of the way and then return another time to complete their journey. The latter may not be practical for those for whom limited leisure time, cost and distance make walking the Caminos a rare luxury. I happen to be amongst those who enjoy walking long daily stages and have no problem in keeping up with - or more often exceeding - his daily prescribed distances. Many first-time walkers do not find this so easy. I feel that for what has become effectively the default stage pattern on some Caminos Brierley's stages are too ambitious.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Year of past OR future Camino
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
-true, and in times of utter trail-constipation, you might want to walk out of sync with the stage suggestion in Brierleys and thus avoid being in need of a bed in the popular stops...
 
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Sharonih

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF (SJPdP to Santiago) March 15, 2018
We found our sweet distance to be an easy 25 km a day that was the comfortable walk for us, some days were less or more but doable. Everyone will find their own sweet spot and go from there
 

Charlotte Lamp

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino frances Sept/Oct 2018
Y'all are too much. This poll makes me really wonder about myself. I have been doing 3-5 mile warm up hikes and that seems to be enough. LOL I hope i can , like some suggest, find my "legs" on the camino. A longggg time ago when I hiked the AT i remember it took me a while to get working/hiking properly,where I was comfortable and not grunting and groaning, but once i fell into a groove it seemed like i was almost riding a walking machine. I loved it. They say on the AT that it takes about 30 days to find your stride. Thank God I have my flights booked 90 days apart so i am in no rush at ALL. I thoroughly intend to enjoy it, not rush it nor avoid all pain if possible. The last has always been one of my goals in life. LOL
I am glad to see that someone else is okay with lower mileage. Starting first Camino on 9/1 at age 75. I am worried as today walked 7 miles and had pain in one foot. Not new. Since our accommodations are booked will have to do a combination of walking and transport until walking gets built up.
 

JoanL

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
There have been a few new Pilgrims on the forum recently who seem worried about the distance they 'have' to walk each day. Of course the daily distance is a totally personal thing.

So as to make this poll as scientific as possible, this Poll relates to the Camino Frances only and during good weather. i.e. not a Winter Camino.

What would you estimate is your 'average' distance walked per day? I'll kick off. Mine is only 21 kms :oops:

Some like to walk long and some like to walk short......... ;)

Don't include non walking / rest days
Thank you for this! Helps my training and planning.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Helps my training and planning.
Hi Joan - Welcome to the forum. You have responded to a thread that is several years old. However, I'm glad you did, because I've been thinking about this question of how fast and how far we walk.

In estimating the distance for a day, you need to consider both walking speed and how many hours you can tolerate. If someone walks 20% faster, they can walk 30 km in the time it takes me to walk 25 km.

On good, level paths at home, I walk comfortably about 4.5 km/h and can do that for hours. Add a loaded backpack and my speed slows to 4 km/h. That's my speed on level(ish) ground on the Camino. However, to allow for rests and variable terrain I usually plan on 3 km/h. And I like to have a leisurely start in the morning. That means that between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. I would typically walk no more than 25 km. Anything more than that - an 8 hour day - requires some deliberate effort!

For planning purposes in advance, I plan about 20 km/day - to allow for slow days, short stages for whatever reason, general fatigue, etc.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, Muxia-Fisterra 2017
Portuguese 2018, Catalan 2019, (Mozarabe-VdlP-Sanabres-Ingles, 2021)
I have always walked 30 Kms per day on each of my Caminos. BUT..... I certainly wouldn’t recommend it to a first-timer, and I honestly don’t know why I do it myself. At the end of each day, I question my own motivation, and promise myself that “tomorrow, I will slow down and be a bit easier on myself“. And then I keep breaking my own promise again. I just enjoy it too much, and despite my advanced years, I still have lots of energy left at the end of each day.

Recognising the reason behind Joanl’s question, I will try to be more constructive, and make a helpful contribution to your planning. In my opinion, a reasonably fit person will find it practical, manageable, enjoyable and realistic to walk 15 miles/24 kms per day. This will give you enough time to see what needs to seen, contemplate your place in the universe, relax and socialise with your fellow pelegrinos, and still give you a sense of having made good progress. Your feet, legs and back won’t complain, and you will be in perfect condition to start fresh the next day. Brierley stages are actually a very good guideline to adopt, at least at the beginning. He knew what he was doing when he wrote his guidebooks.
 
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Some good advice there from @C clearly and @Adrian Harding 60 .

There are lots of variables of course. Such as accommodation preferences.

I tend to book a bed a day ahead. That means I can take my time walking, and I'll often be 'on the road' for 8-10 hours. But I walk slowly. 3 kph including breaks. So even walking for 8 hours I'm only covering 24 kms.

Another key factor is health and fitness. I have bad feet and knees. So distance is a key factor for me.
At 25 kms I start to hurt. At 30 kms, it hurts a lot. At 30 kms +............ I just want to lay down with strong painkillers! :oops:

I think the key is to remain flexible in your plans/goals. Take each day as it comes.
Some days you'll want to walk further, others you won't, and now and again, you might just want to take a day off from walking.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
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But I walk slowly. 3 kph including breaks. So even walking for 8 hours I'm only covering 24 kms.
Pet peeve coming up (I have more than one) -

Many people insist on talking about how "slowly" they walk. Who says 3 kph including breaks (of undefined length) is "slow"? It is what I do over the course of a day, and I don't consider it slow! I consider it to be in the range of normal. Slower than some, faster than some, and I have no idea what an average speed would be. :rolleyes: :cool:
 
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Pet peeve coming up (I have more than one) -

Many people insist on talking about how "slowly" they walk. Who says 3 kph including breaks (of undefined length) is "slow"? It is what I do over the course of a day, and I don't consider it slow! I consider it to be in the range of normal. Slower than some, faster than some, and I have no idea what an average speed would be. :rolleyes: :cool:

I judge that I'm "slow", in that everyone passes me, and I pass no one :cool:

But it's all very personal and really who cares.
I'm happy with my speed......

I shall now classify myself as 'not fast' ;)

With the 'Boss' it drops to 2.5 kph.
The long lunches probably don't help... :rolleyes:
 
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VNwalking

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I judge that I'm "slow", in that everyone passes me, and I pass no one
So 'relatively' slow, right @Robo?
Your criterion is not a judgement, merely a comparison.

But it's all very personal and really who cares.
I'm happy with my speed......
Amen.
Me too.
Although I have to say I envy the people who can easily do 40 km a day, because on limited time that means you can do a longer Camino. I could do that if I had to once, but not day after day.
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
For me, the "sweet spot" seems to be 20-25 km a day, adjusted of course for terrain, slope (down can be worse than up), weather, how far into my camino I am (you gain strength and endurance, but you can also pick up injuries), etc. I like to then tack on several days to my estimate to give my self a cushion in case things don't go as planned.
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
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I kept track of our 2015 SJPdP-ScC portion of our camino. It was 58 days, about 8 weeks, with 48 walking days. Peg had illness and injury time off during weeks 4, 5 and 6. Just counting walking days we averaged 10.5 miles per day in the first 3 weeks, 8.5 miles per day in the next 3 weeks and 9.5 miles per day for the last 2 weeks.

In kilometers (roughly) 17, 13.5, 15.

I later walked to Finisterra alone in 3 days and together we took 2 days to end in Muxia.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Year of past OR future Camino
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Y'all are too much. This poll makes me really wonder about myself. I have been doing 3-5 mile warm up hikes and that seems to be enough. LOL I hope i can , like some suggest, find my "legs" on the camino. A longggg time ago when I hiked the AT i remember it took me a while to get working/hiking properly,where I was comfortable and not grunting and groaning, but once i fell into a groove it seemed like i was almost riding a walking machine. I loved it. They say on the AT that it takes about 30 days to find your stride. Thank God I have my flights booked 90 days apart so i am in no rush at ALL. I thoroughly intend to enjoy it, not rush it nor avoid all pain if possible. The last has always been one of my goals in life. LOL

We are content to move like snails and enjoy our walk and not worry about miles!
 

Lexicos

Jimmy
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Depends on the weather and how I feel Robo ..... can be anywhere between 16 and 40 .. on average. Give me a good reason and I'll do 70 or even 100, one off. And it wouldn't be the first time. Often I don't bother to count ...... too much of a distraction.
 
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Depends on the weather and how I feel Robo ..... can be anywhere between 16 and 40 .. on average. Give me a good reason and I'll do 70 or even 100, one off. And it wouldn't be the first time. Often I don't bother to count ...... too much of a distraction.

One of these days I might try to set the record for the 'slowest' Camino! :)
Late starts.
Stop at every village for a coffee.
Visit every church.
See any interesting sights.
Try all the 'alternative' routes.
Siesta under a tree each day....
10 kms per day sounds like a good 'target'

Maybe set off by 10 am after a leisurely breakfast.
Then a bit of a walk to build up an appetite for lunch.
Lunch at 2pm....
Hmm. Then what?
A few kilometres more, a bit of sightseeing?

It would be hard to walk less that that (10 kms) I think........:rolleyes:
But might be worth a try one day :cool:
 

Roland49

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
It would be hard to walk less that that (10 kms) I think........:rolleyes:
But might be worth a try one day
That sounds like a plan after I got retired.

I have 30 days off per year and can get those days only on school-breaks (public servant).
The only time of year for the next 16 years (yes, you retire at 67 in Germany) is in the summer break (42days) to get more than 14 days off.

Sometimes you have to walk more than 10km for the next albergue. Maybe even more after the "bug" is gone and things get sorted out on the different Caminos.

My plan to walk the CP from Porto on the Easter-break this year is still alive, but I don't know if I'm valid to fly w/o vaccination. Things change rapidly at the moment.

BC
Roland
 

trecile

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I would be bored only walking 10 km per day. That's only about 2 hours walking, depending on the terrain. There's not a lot to do in many of the villages for the rest of the day.
 

MikeJS

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For me it is about 35 to 40km per day. I find this works well as I start off at around 0700 normally and get to my destinations at around 1500/1600 depending on how long I stop for lunch. This gives me ample time at my destination to sort myself out and wash clothes etc before I eat that night. If I walked 25 km I would be at my destination by about midday! But then I just love the process of walking.
 

Anhalter

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
I did plan for 20km/d for my first camino.
I ended averaging almost 30km/d on my 29d of walking. Average speed was 5.75kph while moving.

Let me elaborate:
When walking at home with my wife, we used to argue quite often. She says I'm running away, i say she is dawdling.
It took us some time to figure out we just have different preferences and finally we made adaptations.

For me, walking is pleasure. When walking, i like to do that for some time without stopping. I get into my rhythm quite fast. Being there, i do not have to spend much effort in watching out for stuff regarding my walking, so i can watch my surroundings. Landscapes, Flora, Birds and such. But for this i need to be able to walk in my own speed, which seems to be rather high for a hiker.
Walking slower or waiting for someone breaks that rhythm. Even as i know,that from a physical point it does not make sense, walking slow is more arduous for me than walking fast.

Now that we covered speed, lets talk distance. I think we can agree, that sleeping beyond 6.30-07.00 in an albergue is difficult. Since my backpack is quite organized and i need some time to be hungry for breakfast it takes me only 15-20min from leaving bed to leaving the albergue. Now if i stop a time or two, i'll have covered a good 25km around noon. My first few days i did that. And it felt wrong ending my days that early.
So, enjoying the walking a lot, my days grew longer, most of the time more than 30km, sometimes closer to 40km.

There is a downside however: The people you meet and take a liking to usually won't be walking as much. So you eventually lose them which is a bit sad. I tried to work around this by staying extra nights in the bigger cities for them to be able to catch up. But that was not a perfect solution.
 
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trecile

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Walking slower or waiting for someone breaks that rhythm. Even as i know,that from a physical point it does not make sense, walking slow is more arduous for me than walking fast.
I agree. If I walk much slower or faster than my natural pace I am uncomfortable, and walking too slow can even cause me some back pain.
A few years ago I walked with a friend who walks much slower than I do. I ended up walking with her for a while, then walking my own pace, and stopping periodically for her to catch up. Then repeating the cycle.
 
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I would be bored only walking 10 km per day. That's only about 2 hours walking, depending on the terrain. There's not a lot to do in many of the villages for the rest of the day.

That's true. At my normal speed it would take me 3 hours to cover 10 kms......
 
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I did plan for 20km/d for my first camino.
I ended averaging almost 30km/d on my 29d of walking. Average speed was 5.75kph while moving.

Wow.

I once walked at 6 kph for 2 hours to catch up to a friend.
It felt like being back in the Army on a 'speed march' :eek:
The transition to a jog is about 7 kph for most people I think.
I'll stick to my 3-4 kph :)
 

trecile

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When I walk on my treadmill I set the speed at 4 mph/6.43 km per hr. That's very comfortable on the treadmill, but when I'm walking outside I'm usually closer to 3.5 mph, depending on the terrain.
 
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Albertagirl

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I have no idea what my new speed and distance will be, now that I have the go-ahead from my doctor to do what I want, after getting a new knee three months ago. I have eight months before my tentatively planned Levante to get myself in shape and comfortable with whatever will be my new normal pace. And of course I need to plan before I leave, if I want to finish the route before my flight home. Will my walking distance per day still be my previous 20-25 km. per day? On balance, I think so. My legs just want to walk, my hips to swing, at a particular pace. The challenge will be to start slowly now and move back gradually to my usual pace. I need to catch up. I wanna run, now.
 

David with new Kit!

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Year of past OR future Camino
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We averaged c. 24kms but felt we went too fast and didn’t take enough time to explore more. We both have the time now, so it will take what it takes next time out.......
 
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While mountains of snow from last night will impede today's walking speed (the province is under lockdown, so one should only go out for groceries, and if your preferred shop is 8.9km away....), I have been dawdling at an average of 3-4km/hr this winter. On the Camino, I normally manage about 20-25km/day unless the path that day is fairly savage, in which case a maximum of 20km is good enough. But as @Albertagirl suggests, one's hips and legs just want to get back to their pace, which bring us to our primordial human identity as walkers.

I used to worry about this, but have moved more to a hours per day approach, and analyzing my most recent three caminos, it appears that I have slowed down considerably. I usually provide for a 2d breakfast around ten o'clock, and try to arrive in the afternoon in time for a siesta (a salutory practice which I have imported into my daily routine). I normally book my evening's accommodation the day before, very much based on my state of mind after the end of a day, and on the del Norte generally kept with a few km of 20 (not always! curse the walk to Markina!). My own experience of rest days was not positive; for me, short days worked better.

Other posters have given very good advice about not being bound by guidebooks' stages. They should also note the route profiles, as a km on the upgrade is much longer in effort expended than one on the level, and 2km on the upgrade even more so.

In any case, these are just delicious considerations to ponder until the days when the Camino is open again.
 
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I agree. If I walk much slower or faster than my natural pace I am uncomfortable, and walking too slow can even cause me some back pain.
A few years ago I walked with a friend who walks much slower than I do. I ended up walking with her for a while, then walking my own pace, and stopping periodically for her to catch up. Then repeating the cycle.

I do that with Pat. Very hard walking with others.
She keeps plodding along and I Stop / Start as I get too far ahead.
Though turning around to check every 100-200 metres blew my Meniscus eventually :oops:
 

Leigh Macklin

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
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Elevation change affects me quite a bit. I averaged 25 km/day on the CF, around 35 on the CP but 'only' 20 on the first week of the Norte. No rest days on any of them.

It's good this thread came up again, probably lots of us planning with hope for a future camino. Mine is Le Puy to Pamplona. :)
 
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RefugeInsomniac

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2023
I’ve always found walking pace and distance conversations of interest, especially while on the Camino Frances. Certainly, every person has their own approach and comfort level, and in many cases, is developed while en route, accessing daily variables, i.e., terrain, weather, health, mood, time… etc.

When tired, I tend to walk faster and with purpose. During inclement weather, I tend to smile and relish the challenge (old army habits). On average, I simply adopt a pace which I feel comfortable and joyfully stroll along my merry way; this tends (for me) to be 2hrs per 10km. I do not tend to look at this as fast or slow… but a pace which works for me. Over the years, I’ve walked past pilgrims who say “slow down” you’re missing the journey. Hmm, am I? Always found those encounters amusing; as a lover of history, I stop and explore all points of interest to me, whether it be churches, buildings, bridges to stones in the ground.

I also enjoy reading personal approaches to the days walk. As a morning person, I tend to enjoy starting early morning, when the air is crisp and refreshing and finishing no-later-than 1 pm +/-. This approach works well for me, as I find lodging, do my laundry, hang it to dry when the sun is still out… and then off to explore. I understand that many enjoy walking much later into the day, and that’s great, as it’s their journey, but does not work for me.

The point is, my “routine” as it were, is not restrictive, but a means which allows me to explore the surroundings in more depth. In fact, it liberates me and is not a scale of rigidity, but a means to embrace the day’s journey. Also, I probably walk an additional 5km just exploring the smallest of towns.

My pace is my pace, nothing less and nothing more. My comfort level, however, is 20 to 25 km, with a few 29km days.

Looking very much forward to my next Camino (2023?).
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
I do not tend to look at this as fast or slow… but a pace which works for me. Over the years, I’ve walked past pilgrims who say “slow down” you’re missing the journey.
I hear people say what slow walkers they are. Then, I find out that they are walking the same km/h as I do, and I think "That's not slow. That is the same as me, and my speed is normal." It only matters for comparison when we are estimating what time we will arrive at a destination.

For people who say that you are missing the journey by walking 6 km/h whereas they at 3 km/h are somehow seeing a lot more and having a superior journey, is silly as well as a bit insulting! If they are panting and unhappy at your speed, maybe they have a point, but the speed of the world whizzing by (at 6 km/h? o_O🤨) is not the key difference. Certainly, one would miss things at 60 km/h that can be better appreciated at 3 km/h, but that is a huge difference!
 
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Bang on at 25.0 km for the gross average. In general, I started out slow and increased as conditioning and terrain allowed. Trend captured easily in the following personal factoids repeated over multiple Caminos:

Shortest stage: SJPP - Valcarlos: 12.8 km (or SJPP - Orisson: 11.5 km)

Longest stage: Negreira - Olveiroa: 35.9 km

B
 
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I used to worry about this, but have moved more to a hours per day approach, and analyzing my most recent three caminos, it appears that I have slowed down considerably. I usually provide for a 2d breakfast around ten o'clock, and try to arrive in the afternoon in time for a siesta (a salutory practice which I have imported into my daily routine). I normally book my evening's accommodation the day before, very much based on my state of mind after the end of a day, and on the del Norte generally kept with a few km of 20 (not always! curse the walk to Markina!). My own experience of rest days was not positive; for me, short days worked better.

Other posters have given very good advice about not being bound by guidebooks' stages. They should also note the route profiles, as a km on the upgrade is much longer in effort expended than one on the level, and 2km on the upgrade even more so.

In any case, these are just delicious considerations to ponder until the days when the Camino is open again.

Rest days are an interesting point. I always plan some into my overall timeline. But like you a rest day often becomes a short day, rather than a day of non walking. If I stop for a day I tend to wander around looking for things to do and itching to be 'on the road' again.

A true 'rest' day for me tends to happen when my body tells me. In the most obvious ways!
It's usually because of injury and I need to put my feet up for a while.
Or visit a doctor or physio.
"My tendons and I" usually end up visiting a physio a couple of times (great ones in Spain) so that kind of dictates where a rest day occurs.

I think on my next Camino though, whenever that is, I'll try to plan in rest days at historic sites/towns, and make a point of sightseeing a bit. I'm not very good at that. Whilst I walk slowly and 'relatively' short distance, I tend to be a bit 'head down' and too focussed on 'getting there' at times.
 
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You must have taken the long way to Orisson, because it's less than 8 km from SJPDP. 😄
View attachment 92385
Well, @trecile ...that is true if one is a bird. I am not, so rather than flying, I am consigned to walking.

I usually start at Porte St. Jacque - so as a bird, you have 8 km to Orisson. Now, let's adjust to the earthbound bipedal.

For every 100 m vertical climb, it is a rule of thumb to add 0.5 km to the walk. The Porte St. Jacques is about 170 m elevation and Orisson is about 870 m. Sooooo... (0.5 km X ((870-170)/100) = 3.5 km. So, I am reasonably sure that walkers experience 11.5 km of walking to reach Orisson.

Apologies if you do not care for algebra... but it is the way my pedestrian mind works.;)

B
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

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Year of past OR future Camino
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Well, @trecile ...that is true if one is a bird. I am not, so rather than flying, I am consigned to walking.

I usually start at Porte St. Jacque - so as a bird, you have 8 km to Orisson. Now, let's adjust to the earthbound bipedal.

For every 100 m vertical climb, it is a rule of thumb to add 0.5 km to the walk. The Porte St. Jacques is about 170 m elevation and Orisson is about 870 m. Sooooo... (0.5 km X ((870-170)/100) = 3.5 km. So, I am reasonably sure that walkers experience 11.5 km of walking to reach Orisson.

Apologies if you do not care for algebra... but it is the way my pedestrian mind works.;)

B
Using some geometry and algebra though ...

The rise is 800 meters, the run is 8,000 meters which means the square of the hypotenuse is (8000*8000)+(800*800) or 64,640,000 and the square root of that is a hair less than 8,040. So the distance covered isn't much more than 8 km. Even if it feels like, say, 35 km.

Sorry, but that's the way mathematics works. 😈
 

C clearly

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2021
For every 100 m vertical climb, it is a rule of thumb to add 0.5 km to the walk.... So, I am reasonably sure that walkers experience 11.5 km
the distance covered isn't much more than 8 km.
I suspect that adding 0.5 km to the walk is meant to represent subjective difficulty - i.e. the experience. The actual distance is different. Thus, everybody is right!
 
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Okay...but I see Brierley uses the same convention as I (attached). So, if I am delusional, I consider myself in pretty decent company.

When you have a chance though? Go build a road or walking path with a constant 10% grade and see how long it lasts. Pooling, erosions, washboarding, etc make for neither durability nor walkability.

Gotta make dinner for the Bride.

Cooking fish is way more exacting than this little exercise.

B
 

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The rule that Brierley quotes, I think is Naismith's rule.

As far as I know, unless I totally missed something,
it does not mean that due to the height gain, 8 kms on the map actually means 11.5 kms walking over the ground.

It means that due to the height gain, the exertion and time required,
would be like walking 11.5 kms on the flat....... ;)
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

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Warning: The following should only be read by nerds that own a copy of Brieley's guide to the CF. It os something I wrote up long ago but maybe never posted.
The short version, for those who think the discussion below is too long, is: Naismith's Rule indicates that each 100 m of elevation gain adds 12 minutes to the time to do the horizontal distance. Brierly says 20 minutes.
John Brieley's camino guides supply the distances between end points on his stages and also an equivalent distance to help you judge how long it may take walk the stage. His equivalent distance accounts for the slowing of your pace walking uphill. I will try to explain what is happening with this. Let's start with Wikipedia's article on Naismith's rule.
Naismith's rule helps with the planning of a walking or hiking expedition by calculating how long it will take to travel the intended route, including any extra time taken when walking uphill. This rule of thumb was devised by William W. Naismith, a Scottish mountaineer, in 1892. A modern version can be formulated as follows: Allow one hour for every 3 miles forward, plus an additional hour for every 2,000 feet of ascent.
Put into the metric system this is approximately "Allow one hour for every 5 km forward, plus an additional hour for every 600 m of ascent" or equivalently "Allow 12 min for every 1 km forward, plus an additional 10 min for every 100 m of ascent."

So, by this rule (really an approximation), if you walk 20 km forward while gaining 400 m of cumlative elevation you could expect the amount of walking time on the route (for fit 5 kph walkers) to take ( 20 km x 12 min / km ) + ( 400 m x 10 min / 100 m ) = 240 min + 40 min = 280 min (or 4 hr and 40 min).

Walking at the fit hiker's 5 kph pace for that much time on a level trail you would walk 23.3 km and that is the Naismith's rule equivalent level distance. So, to estimate how much time it would take to walk that route for someone who only walked at a 3 kph pace, you would expect a walking time of ( 23.3 km / 3 km/hr ) = 7.766666667 hr or 7 hr and 47 min.

Using the distance of 20 km the above arithmetic is easier to read but if the distance were the 20.6 km (12.8 miles) that Brierley claims is the distance for the Astorga to Rabanal section of the camino we would expect a Naismith 5 kph pace to finish in (20.6*12)+40 = 287.2 minutes (4 hours, 47 minutes or 4:47). The Naismith equivalent level distance would be how far a person could walk in 287.2 minutes covering 1 km every 12 minutes (5 kph) and that would be 23.9 km. That Naismith equivalent level distance done at 3 kph is (23.9/3)=7.97 (7 hours, 58 minutes or 7:58).

Now let's see how Brierley supplies us with an equivalent distance for the Astorga to Rabanal section of the camino.

Brierley uses a variant of Naimith's equivalent distance. He keeps the 10 minutes for every 100 m of ascent part of the Naimith's rule but he assumes your level walking pace to be 3 kph, a more leisurely pace than Naismith's 5 kph. A speed of 3 kph is 20 minutes per km.
Brierley says the 40 minutes extra time accounted for by the slower speed of ascent over the level walking time would be at a 3 kph pace and thus the uphill portion of the equivalent distance is the distance covered in that 40 minutes, 2.0 km. So he adds 20.6 + 2.0 to get his equivalent distance of 22.6 km.

I skip the computations this time but Brierley leads us to believe that the walking time for his equivalent distance for the Astorga to Rabanal section would take 4 hours, 31 minutes (4:31) if walked at a 5 kph pace and at a 3 kph pace it would take 7 hours, 32 minutes (7:32).

Here is a table of possible walking times for the Astorga to Rabanal section:
Code:
               3kph  5kph
Brierley    7:32   4:31
Naismith 7:58   4:47

So who is right? Who can tell? Maybe one on one stage of the camino and ther other on another stage. Trail conditions can change for one stage to another and within a stage. Maybe you start out at one speed and then, without noticing, slow down for scenic sections or speed up along roads to get away from traffic. It is an approximation and a way of letting you know that you can't just take the distance to walk and your average speed to get an accurate determination of your walking time from point to point. It also doesn't account for additional time you take when you stop to rest, enjoy a bar or smell the roses.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Warning: The following should only be read by nerds that own a copy of Brieley's guide to the CF. It os something I wrote up long ago but maybe never posted.

John Brieley's camino guides supply the distances between end points on his stages and also an equivalent distance to help you judge how long it may take walk the stage. His equivalent distance accounts for the slowing of your pace walking uphill. I will try to explain what is happening with this. Let's start with Wikipedia's article on Naismith's rule.

Put into the metric system this is approximately "Allow one hour for every 5 km forward, plus an additional hour for every 600 m of ascent" or equivalently "Allow 12 min for every 1 km forward, plus an additional 10 min for every 100 m of ascent."

So, by this rule (really an approximation), if you walk 20 km forward while gaining 400 m of cumlative elevation you could expect the amount of walking time on the route (for fit 5 kph walkers) to take ( 20 km x 12 min / km ) + ( 400 m x 10 min / 100 m ) = 240 min + 40 min = 280 min (or 4 hr and 40 min).

Walking at the fit hiker's 5 kph pace for that much time on a level trail you would walk 23.3 km and that is the Naismith's rule equivalent level distance. So, to estimate how much time it would take to walk that route for someone who only walked at a 3 kph pace, you would expect a walking time of ( 23.3 km / 3 km/hr ) = 7.766666667 hr or 7 hr and 47 min.

Using the distance of 20 km the above arithmetic is easier to read but if the distance were the 20.6 km (12.8 miles) that Brierley claims is the distance for the Astorga to Rabanal section of the camino we would expect a Naismith 5 kph pace to finish in (20.6*12)+40 = 287.2 minutes (4 hours, 47 minutes or 4:47). The Naismith equivalent level distance would be how far a person could walk in 287.2 minutes covering 1 km every 12 minutes (5 kph) and that would be 23.9 km. That Naismith equivalent level distance done at 3 kph is (23.9/3)=7.97 (7 hours, 58 minutes or 7:58).

Now let's see how Brierley supplies us with an equivalent distance for the Astorga to Rabanal section of the camino.

Brierley uses a variant of Naimith's equivalent distance. He keeps the 10 minutes for every 100 m of ascent part of the Naimith's rule but he assumes your level walking pace to be 3 kph, a more leisurely pace than Naismith's 5 kph. A speed of 3 kph is 20 minutes per km.
Brierley says the 40 minutes extra time accounted for by the slower speed of ascent over the level walking time would be at a 3 kph pace and thus the uphill portion of the equivalent distance is the distance covered in that 40 minutes, 2.0 km. So he adds 20.6 + 2.0 to get his equivalent distance of 22.6 km.

I skip the computations this time but Brierley leads us to believe that the walking time for his equivalent distance for the Astorga to Rabanal section would take 4 hours, 31 minutes (4:31) if walked at a 5 kph pace and at a 3 kph pace it would take 7 hours, 32 minutes (7:32).

Here is a table of possible walking times for the Astorga to Rabanal section:
Code:
               3kph  5kph
Brierley    7:32   4:31
Naismith 7:58   4:47

So who is right? Who can tell? Maybe one on one stage of the camino and ther other on another stage. Trail conditions can change for one stage to another and within a stage. Maybe you start out at one speed and then, without noticing, slow down for scenic sections or speed up along roads to get away from traffic. It is an approximation and a way of letting you know that you can't just take the distance to walk and your average speed to get an accurate determination of your walking time from point to point. It also doesn't account for additional time you take when you stop to rest, enjoy a bar or smell the roses.
Of course none of these calculations means that the distance between SJPDP and Orisson on the Camino is actually 11.5 km. It might feel like it, and take the same amount of time as walking 11.5 km on level ground, but the actual distance covered is approximately 7.6 km. If we were talking about the distance as the crow flies it would be even less.

It's kind of like the wind chill factor.
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Of course none of these calculations means that the distance between SJPDP and Orisson on the Camino is actually 11.5 km. It might feel like it, and take the same amount of time as walking 11.5 km on level ground, but the actual distance covered is approximately 7.6 km. If we were talking about the distance as the crow flies it would be even less.

It's kind of like the wind chill factor.
I agree completely. And wind chill is another misunderstood approximation.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2017
The rule that Brierley quotes, I think is Naismith's rule.

As far as I know, unless I totally missed something,
it does not mean that due to the height gain, 8 kms on the map actually means 11.5 kms walking over the ground.

It means that due to the height gain, the exertion and time required,
would be like walking 11.5 kms on the flat....... ;)
Yep, I respect opinions expressed (@Robo & @Rick of Rick and Peg ) but I come at this from an entirely different angle.

It does NOT make me "right" but I was just trying to provide an accurate answer to the OP.

Assumption:

Brierley was using "aerial" (ie. 2D point-to-point distances) for his base.

B's experience:

Having been nearly killed by our U.S. National Forest Service maps on two different outings in the 70's, I did three things:

- switched to topographic maps
- found trail builders and got their input on "line of walk" vs "line of travel"
- based upon their input, used a 4-5% grade for "line of walk" because anything more (on average) meant the trail would be gone in 2-3 yrs, at most. Erosion, under-cuts, washouts, etc......

B's subsequent adaptation, which generally worked to keep planning close to reality:

- Assume an average grade of 5% for "line walked" as opposed to distance of "line of travel" between Start and Finish.

Should @Rick of Rick and Peg wish to re-do his calculations for a grade of 5% (so 800 m rise in 16,000m walked) then I think the increase in distance walked is rather significant...and even higher than the multiple used for Naismith's "experiential rule".

A simple visual is attached, and no, I did not do it "to scale". I'm on the way out the door for some errands before prep of the evening meal.

We should "agree to disagree" on this point, if nothing else.

B
 

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aname4me

aname4me
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 2015, 2017, 2019, (2021)
I walked 3 Caminos with my Wife. We walked 21-25Km per day.

My last Camino I walked with my Son (age 33), after Pamplona, we walked 25-32Km per day.


I noticed an interesting difference.

With my Wife, we would see the same Retired people each night.

With my Son, we would see the same Younger people each night.


Conclusion..... The distance you walk, determines the people you meet.
 

PlutseligPilegrim

Rota Vicentina, fisherman’s trail, is sweet...
Year of past OR future Camino
St Olav’s way Novgorod - Åbo
- Stiklestad - Nidaros (2019)
Via del a plata from Cadiz (2019)
There have been a few new Pilgrims on the forum recently who seem worried about the distance they 'have' to walk each day. Of course the daily distance is a totally personal thing.

So as to make this poll as scientific as possible, this Poll relates to the Camino Frances only and during good weather. i.e. not a Winter Camino.

What would you estimate is your 'average' distance walked per day? I'll kick off. Mine is only 21 kms :oops:

Some like to walk long and some like to walk short......... ;)

Don't include non walking / rest days
One thesis I think is far more describing than distance is.....hours....

So......if one look into how many hours underway before looking into a place to sleep......I think that takes the physical ability aspect out of it.....

Why is it so....?

Say someone states walking 4 hours a day and the other is using 8 ....they could still walk the same distance.

The only difference is that the first walks 5 km/h and stops around lunchtime/siesta. The latter is arriving before dinner time with 2,5 km average, sun starting to drop.

Both reaching same numeric number but I reckon they have two very different experiences.

I met 78 year old Herman from Graz in Austria one days walk out of Porto. He was on his way to Fatima. Arriving there he concluded a total of 4000 km from home. Walking 40 km a day. As he said;” I’m not a fast walker.....I just use the full day ....and I never book accommodation in advance ...”

I’m leaning into Herman’s philosophy ....no rush.....use the day....
 
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(May 2015)
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(May 2018)
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One thesis I think is far more describing than distance is.....hours....


I’m leaning into Herman’s philosophy ....no rush.....use the day....

I agree. I find that quite often I see the same people in the evenings, but I just arrived 2-3 hours after they did ;)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I agree. I find that quite often I see the same people in the evenings, but I just arrived 2-3 hours after they did ;)
Most everyone passes me up on all of my Camino's, but I don't care. I enjoy myself, take my time, stop to take lots of pictures and smell the roses along the way, which is why I smell like one.🙃 My leisurely pace has cost me missing out on a particular albergue once or twice, but I've never had any injuries, which is worth a lot, imo.
 
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RefugeInsomniac

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2023
IMO these discussions continue to demonstrate the individuality of our Caminos and associated walking speeds. “Smelling the roses” is not dependent on distance or time; one does not see more nor less, or factor fewer/more injuries. Simply put, there is no one-size/method/gait-fits-all.

We adopt our approaches based on our "personal" needs, ability, and goals. My methodology is time-based and acceptable daily distances, i.e., an approach I’m comfortable with.

It basically comes down to our gait and mobility measure which will depend on several efficiency factors, perhaps more so than distance- versus time.

Ones walking (preferred) speed, I suggest is more associated with your fitness level, overall health, and age – gender. Our brain is responsible for both our movements and our balance, meaning age does play a large factor. Other factors include terrain, stability, and again personal objectives; and objectives are there whether acknowledged or not.

Bottom line, we each walk for our own purpose, and at our own comfortable gait; we start, pause and stop to our own rhythm, and that’s what’s important.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I will add that length of our legs factors in speed, no matter fitness level. When I have walked locally with one of my friends, either I must slow down or she must speed up to walk together. I am not tall at 5'4", but my legs are rather long. She is only 5'1" with very short legs. Possibly we both have the same fitness level, but our speeds at arriving at a destination would be quite different if walking independently.
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Okay...but I see Brierley uses the same convention as I (attached). So, if I am delusional, I consider myself in pretty decent company.
I think that Brierley uses equivalent distance to keep complaints down.

Naismith used his "rule" to find the approximate time it would take for a fit hiker to complete a planned route. That likely would be given in hours and minutes. If Brierley did that in his guide the slower walkers would be complaining along the lines like "What! It took me at least 3 hours longer."

Thus the time that was computed by using Naismith's rule is tweaked into an "equivalent" distance. If someone who walked at the speed Naismith based his rule on (3mph, 5kph) divided the equivalent distance by the speed he normally walks then the time to get from point A to B would come out very close to what Naismith would have figured. Slower or faster walkers would (hopefully) divide the equivalent distance by their own normal speed to get a figure close to THEIR estimated completion time.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
On the Camino del Norte, in parts of Cantabria there are distance signs that also show an estimated time. I don't remember how accurate there were.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Rule of thumb for me is three miles per hour (4.8km) with a 70 lb pack. Ten minute break then back to it. At the time I was in my 20s.
Today, it's still three miles per hour with a 20 lb pack and I'm in my 70s.
The only thing that's changed is the sequence of two of the numbers.
 
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