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Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Which poncho?

ncwep

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Spring 2023
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Hi @ncwep, on our many trips to the Camino, I have only walked in the rain one time for about 20 minutes during the summer. My husband on the other hand has walked in the winter and has walked in the cold rain so we appreciate good gear. We now have Frog Togg brand ponchos for summer. Very lightweight and inexpensive and recommended by one of our forum members @davebugg who is also a gear tester. I think Altus is probably a top of the line poncho, but heavier and would be perfect for a winter Camino when it rains a lot more. I would also wear rain pants in the winter for extra warmth, but I don't bring them in the summer any more. I only use gaiters when hiking in the snow here in Wyoming. I don't have experience with the Decathlon poncho model. Buen Camino!
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
I love my Altus poncho. After a camino in poor clothing when I got saturated in Galacia I really appreciate it. I rarely need rain trousers with it.
 
As long as you have some kind of poncho, you'll be fine. Even a large garbage bag does the job if you're desperate enough!

I've got a german brand poncho similar to the two you mentioned, about 500g weight, but no full length zipper. It's very sturdy so I don't mind the few grams extra, and it works very well. Happy I upgraded from a cheap sleeveless one to that one. Also works as another layer for warmth over the sleeping bag in cold nights, or as a picnic blanket. Love that thing.

If you intend to walk in winter, gaiters or rain pants are great combined with a good poncho, but in may/june it's unlikely you'll really need them on the Francés.

Buen Camino!
 
Frogg lightweight never used walked November no paucho destroyed outside Leon.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I bought an Altus poncho while walking the Camino this last September and really like it. I live in Seattle and walk with my gear on the weekends and so far so good. I’ve been hoping for real “squall” but so far just snow and light rain this winter. Maybe it’ll rain harder this spring and I can give it a better workout!
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
As long as you have some kind of poncho, you'll be fine. Even a large garbage bag does the job if you're desperate enough!

I've got a german brand poncho similar to the two you mentioned, about 500g weight, but no full length zipper. It's very sturdy so I don't mind the few grams extra, and it works very well. Happy I upgraded from a cheap sleeveless one to that one. Also works as another layer for warmth over the sleeping bag in cold nights, or as a picnic blanket. Love that thing.

If you intend to walk in winter, gaiters or rain pants are great combined with a good poncho, but in may/june it's unlikely you'll really need them on the Francés.

Buen Camino!
Thanks for the poncho idea for added warmth on cold nights. And perfect....think I will skip the gaiters, they were adding too much bulk.
 
Hi @ncwep, on our many trips to the Camino, I have only walked in the rain one time for about 20 minutes during the summer. My husband on the other hand has walked in the winter and has walked in the cold rain so we appreciate good gear. We now have Frog Togg brand ponchos for summer. Very lightweight and inexpensive and recommended by one of our forum members @davebugg who is also a gear tester. I think Altus is probably a top of the line poncho, but heavier and would be perfect for a winter Camino when it rains a lot more. I would also wear rain pants in the winter for extra warmth, but I don't bring them in the summer any more. I only use gaiters when hiking in the snow here in Wyoming. I don't have experience with the Decathlon poncho model. Buen Camino!
Thanks for the info, J Willhaus. And wow, you are very lucky to only have had 20 minutes of rain across multiple Caminos! Hopefully, we will be lucky as well. I think I will skip the gaiters.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I've used an Altus for years. It is the best thing I've come across so far. I've tried expensive jackets and other ponchos. I can't say the Altus and me is a love affair. It is great in cold weather, but I perspire heavily and, even allowing that I can open it down the front and shrug off the sleeves, I still find myself getting wet from the inside.

I wish someone would make a breathable version of the Altus, with pit zips too! I've looked at the Packa, but it is too short imo, and possibly not roomy enough. I suppose I could buy a large, but it is expensive and I don't want to spend a lot of money on something only to find it is no better than what I have.

Currently experimenting with Froggs Toggs poncho (they are cheap). I tried to turn it into an Altus shape (using two), but failed with the sleeves. Now just trying to make the Froggs Toggs longer.

Ah, getting the perfect wet weather gear is a work that never ends...
 
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Currently experimenting with Froggs Toggs poncho (they are cheap). I tried to turn it into an Altus shape (using two), but failed with the sleeves. Now just trying to make the Froggs Toggs longer.
I think that if you get a Frogg Toggs rain coat that is large enough to cover your backpack you could add onto the length of it with either a poncho or another rain coat.
 
I think that if you get a Frogg Toggs rain coat that is large enough to cover your backpack you could add onto the length of it with either a poncho or another rain coat.
Yes, I thought that would work, but when I stuffed my backpack I found the jacket was pulling uncomfortably across the shoulders. It was the biggest size I could find, but obviously not big enough. I contemplated trying to put in an extra piece of Froggs Toggs fabric (cut from the trousers that I will never use) in a kind of vent, but it was beyond my drafting/sewing capabilities. I would also have to seam seal it, as sewing the fabric makes very definite holes. I'm not sure if normal seal sealing tape will work with the Froggs Toggs fabric. Plus I've no experience in seam sealing anything.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
I have a new Frogg poncho which I will never use still in pouch, would love to give to you but I am in Ireland 🇮🇪 any ideas or is it worth pursuing.
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
I'd get a raincoat. I used a poncho on my September 22 Camino Frances hike from St Jean, and I really wish I had taken a rain coat. Spain is known for wind. It is a leader in wind energy. My poncho was absolutely terrible in the wind. Meanwhile, a raincoat is closer to your body and doesn't flap around in the wind like a poncho. Plus you can use your raincoat as a warmth coat when it's just cold. That will save you from taking an extra coat for warmth. If you are just doing Sarria to Santiago, a poncho might be okay. That area is fairly wooded so that will block the wind. But, going across the open spaces of the meseta, a poncho is terrible
 
I'd get a raincoat. I used a poncho on my September 22 Camino Frances hike from St Jean, and I really wish I had taken a rain coat. Spain is known for wind. It is a leader in wind energy. My poncho was absolutely terrible in the wind. Meanwhile, a raincoat is closer to your body and doesn't flap around in the wind like a poncho. Plus you can use your raincoat as a warmth coat when it's just cold. That will save you from taking an extra coat for warmth. If you are just doing Sarria to Santiago, a poncho might be okay. That area is fairly wooded so that will block the wind. But, going across the open spaces of the meseta, a poncho is terrible
Thank you for this....is that true even for the ponchos with arms like the Altus and Decathlon Arpenaz? I'd decided on one of those because they protect your backpack from the rain, but may reconsider. Thanks for the input.
 
I'd get a raincoat. I used a poncho on my September 22 Camino Frances hike from St Jean, and I really wish I had taken a rain coat. Spain is known for wind. It is a leader in wind energy. My poncho was absolutely terrible in the wind. Meanwhile, a raincoat is closer to your body and doesn't flap around in the wind like a poncho. Plus you can use your raincoat as a warmth coat when it's just cold. That will save you from taking an extra coat for warmth. If you are just doing Sarria to Santiago, a poncho might be okay. That area is fairly wooded so that will block the wind. But, going across the open spaces of the meseta, a poncho is terrible
I suspect it depends very much on the type of poncho. I have a Ferrino Trekker, much like the Altus - sleeves with Velcro adjustment at wrist, full front zip (& Velcro).
I have worn it for varying lengths of time on all 7 caminos in super strong wind and very heavy rain. I have absolutely no complaints. It has kept me and my pack completely dry.
It has kept me extra warm over my sleeping bag on very cold nights in albergues with no heating and if I want to use it in the evening I just use the press studs to ‘fold up’ the ‘hunch back’ part and hey presto it’s a coat … perhaps not award winning style but still functional. 🙄
Good luck deciding. It is indeed a very personal choice. 😊
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
I just ordered a Packa http://www.thepacka.com/
after reading several folks positive reviews. It’s a combination of a rain jacket and a poncho. I’ll know more when I receive it and check it out but I think the concept is great.
 
My friend from last years May/June camino used her poncho not at all. I used my rainjacket a few times, but more in regards to wind than rain. Her poncho was 500g, my jacket about 100g. So that was at least 400g of unnecessary weight carried by her.

In the end, it's your decision what you take with you, but i always felt quite good about taking only things i know i will use (or where it's very likely).
For me that ment going on the camino with a minimal rain gear, since chances would be good for little rain. If the weather forecast would indicate something different, i could still buy whatever i was missing.

Worked quite well for two times on the C.Frances so far. (yeah, i am aware that i jinxed it now and will regret it the next time...)
 
Thank you for this....is that true even for the ponchos with arms like the Altus and Decathlon Arpenaz? I'd decided on one of those because they protect your backpack from the rain, but may reconsider. Thanks for the input.
ponchos with arms are probably better than what I had
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I decided not to carry a poncho last year on the Coastal Portugues and just took a large garbage bag (very light!). I used the garbage bag and my dorky hat for 2 days - no problem!
 
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
A poncho that cover backpack and body with 5000 watercoloumn protection is sufficient 98% of time on path. In other words, exellent protection level. For me…?… in my experience as a repetetive peregrino…?…this norm has become a
m i n i m u m cause rare, random and severe rainstorm with undercooled water is also to be «mastered» by all. Btw…weight «penalty» means nothing. Security and comfort means everything. Murphys law.

Ultreia🙏🏼
031790AF-1AA8-48A1-B64A-2D595C2250BA.jpeg
 
I would love to get a new Altus poncho. The problem is I can't find a place to buy one in the United States or Mexico (live in Mexico). I also can't find a store in Madrid or Barcelona. I will be walking the Camino Vasco and if I get on the Camino Frances it will only be in Burgos where the Vasco ends. I will probably fly into Barcelona and make my way up to San Sebastian and then over to Bayonne to begin my camino. As I start later in the year I would like to have my poncho before I leave Bayonne. I would really like to get the Altus as it is light and I know how to get it on really easily. Does anyone know where I can buy an Altus in any of the above cites I have mentioned?
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
I prefer the Ferrino Trekker Ripstop rain poncho because it opens at the front and has both velcro and a zipper. If it doesn't rain that much, I go with it open, and then I don't get so wet inside. And you can put it on yourself over the backpack. Use the link to buy.

 
For those using a poncho, this minor modification will make walking in windy conditions a 'breeze'. Plus, it is quick to implement when needed.

---------------------------------

This is one very easy method IF you want a tie-off that stays attached to the poncho between uses.

Materials:
Two lengths of cord ( I prefer a 1.2 mm Dyneema tent cord) found at outdoor stores like REI, online stores like Amazon, Zpacks, etc


1578777850164.png


Tape or self adhesive fabric to reinforce a small hole. (Tenacious Tape is great for this application). You can also find this at many outdoor stores, and online, like Amazon.


1578777550705.png



With the poncho on, find your waist.

At the back edge of the poncho, on both your right and left sides, place a at around your waist level and make a mark. If needed, have a helper make the mark. I just reach back an grab the edge myself.

With the poncho removed, at each mark, take a piece of of Tenacious Tape (duct tape, etc.), about 2" in length or a bit longer, and wrap the tape so that it goes over the top and bottom sides of the edge and then extends at least 3/4" from the edge of the poncho.

Next, make a tiny incision in the material through the tape. Keep the incision at least 1/2 from the edge of the poncho. Option: For those who wish to do so, you can attach a grommet

The amount of cord for each side of the poncho will depend on how much girth one has. You need two (2) lengths of cord. . one for each side of the poncho. Thread a length of cord through the incisions you made and tie it off using a square knot.

You will now have two thin, dangling lengths of cord hanging from the waist height of your poncho.

When needed due to wind, grab each length of cord, bringing them to the front of your poncho. Tie the ends together like a shoelace.

You can apply as little or as much tension as you wish, but do not over-tighten, as this will stress the poncho fabric unnecessarily. Now you can button up as much or as little of the sides of the poncho as you wish, adjusting for desired airflow.

When not needed, gather up the dangly cord into a bundle (do this for each side) like an extension cord. You will not notice it as you walk, but it is easily released if needed. I use a twist tie that is kept attached to each cord.

It takes all of 5 minutes to add the modification, and seconds to deploy when the weather calls for it.

If you would rather carry a separate cord or rope or bungee to use as a belt around the poncho, those work too. Of course you need to make sure it is easily reached if you decide you need it.
 
I do not argue personal choices, which are a subjective thing. . . what someone likes is not arguable. Some folks like liver and onions, others hate both.

For the last decade, at least, I have found myself choosing a poncho for wet-weather walking. There are certain usability characteristics that I now prefer with ponchos. So I will point out some things that are objective considerations about the poncho. Again, there is no wrong choice because personal taste and preference is based around a huge number of variables, and every person has unique need and wants..

Altus and other similar sleeved hybrids of ponchos (rainchos?) can also share the some of the benefits of poncho use, but are generally heavier and bulkier, if that is an issue.

Ponchos that I would recommend are pretty lightweight. As an example, The Frogg Toggs when it is actually scaled, weighs around the 6 ounce mark. They can be had for $15.00 to $25.00, so that is a HUGE bargain for a highly functional piece of rain protective gear.

If I use my Zpacks poncho which is made from Dyneema (Cuben Fiber), it weighs just a bit more than 2.5 ounces and is tough as nails. I do like the Frogg Toggs a lot, though, and have used it quite a bit.

I find a poncho is more easily deployed. I can pull it out of the side pocket of my backpack and slip it on over my backpack, and I do not even have to stop. I usually do pause for the ten seconds it takes to put on, because I am becoming a bit clumsy :) I do not need to take my backpack off, put on a rain jacket, put the backpack back on.

This alone is a huge factor for me when it rains - as is often the case - it is off and on while walking. Periodic sprinkles and showers can eat up a lot of time and energy with a rain jacket IF you take it off and put it on as the immediate conditions change. There is no need to fiddle with rain covers on backpacks, and shoulder straps remain dry.

With a poncho, I can respond to conditions within seconds. I can whip off the poncho as soon as the rain has slowed or stopped, and not question "should I wait to see if it starts back up?" This helps to keep sweat condensation way down.

Air circulation and ventilation reduce condensation moisture build up, and this is helped along because of the poncho sitting over the backpack, creating air space between itself and the body.

A poncho can work equally as well, and even more flexibly, as an outer layer. The same quickness to deploy and remove a poncho works well in trying to avoid unexpected wind chill. And if the morning is cool as I start to walk, but I know I will be warm after a short walk, simply putting the poncho on for a few minutes and then whipping it off works well to avoid overheating.

On my poncho, I spend about 15 minutes after I purchase it and add a slight modification with cordage that controls flappiness and billowing during windy, stormy conditions.

On the aesthetics side, rain jackets do have the edge. . . depending on if form is a factor with regard to function.

And ponchos are great multitaskers:
  • A shelter lean-to. A bit of cord and trekking poles make it even more independent in setting up.
  • A sun shelter, it can be rigged up to provide you shade in hot climates.
  • Ground cloth: Under a tent, or a survival shelter, a poncho can protect you from the damp ground. If you are in a cold damp climate, this can help you stay warm.
  • Wind Break: A poncho without a liner will not have much insulation. However, as an outer shell, it can add an additional 10 to 20 degrees of warmth to whatever insulating layer you are wearing. You will stay warmer wearing the poncho in windy weather, helping to protect you from wind chill.
  • Privacy: A great makeshift, emergency privacy screen when needing a Nature Break where a natural coverage of bushes or tall grass is scarce. It also works when needing to change pants or shorts.
  • Sit pad. When taking a break and the ground and benches and flat rocks and logs, etc. are damp.
  • Mattress cover.
  • An emergency backpack or carryall when you do not have a small daypack.
  • A windshell to add a bit of extra warmth to clothing layers. It is great for those cool, early mornings when you need something that can be quickly removed after you have warmed up from walking.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I prefer the Ferrino Trekker Ripstop rain poncho because it opens at the front and has both velcro and a zipper.
I have one sitting in my closet that I wore only once on the Levante. Luckily that was all the rain I had in 42 days, because I would have suffered if I had had to wear it for long periods of rain. It is a very high quality poncho, great worksmanship, but…..

My oft-repeated caution about the Ferrino Trekker is that it has a metallic lining to help prevent hypothermia. If worn in winter, that could be an important feature, but what I have found is that it just makes me start sweating as soon as I put it on in spring or summer. I save it because I hope that someday I will be able to walk in winter!
 
I highly recommend the Altus poncho. I experienced about 10 days of solid rain on the Camino Frances last fall (September-October) starting in Galicia —->Finisterre. I was dry the entire time. The zipper and velcro in the front allowed me to wear it open for ventilation when not actively raining.
 

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The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I wish someone would make a breathable version of the Altus, with pit zips too!

I recently read some stuff on waterproof ratings. I think it was here in the forum. There is nothing that is is breathable and completely waterproof.
First Camino Frances In June/ July I had a Gortex jacket but it didn’t really rain much at all.
Second Camino Portuguese had some very rainy days but was warm. I had a not-very waterproof lightweight jacket and got wet but didn’t mind. I also had gaiters so boots stayed dry.
Last Camino VDLP October/November I had an umbrella, my lightweight jacket and eventually a Decathlon poncho and used in various combinations. Still wasn’t too cold while raining even in late November so legs and boots got wet but that was fine.
My Decathlon poncho got wet on the inside and at first I thought it was poor quality but then someone with an Altus said they all will eventually - either from perspiration or the rain finally getting through.
I think walking in the rain in really cold weather would be a nightmare - but given that I will probably not walk a winter Camino these days I practice not worrying so much about rain and getting wet. It might be uncomfortable but as my mother would say - are you made of sugar or something? 🤣

 
No matter what your rain gear preference is, be sure to try it out a home in a long walk in the rain. Adjust accordingly to your experience.

Do not wait until you get to Spain to try out rain or any other gear! There is no magic poncho.


-Paul
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Rain ponchos work great if you are standing still on guard duty. If walking for hours they become portable saunas.

I've walked many, many kms with ponchos. Air flow is much better than with rain jackets in my experience, because ponchos have a much more loose fit.

It's a matter of personal choice of course, but a poncho is certainly not more of a sauna than a rain jacket.

Close it only when the rain is pouring. Lift it up or open the zipper when it's raining only lightly and/or warm enough.

In a light, warm summer rain no need for a poncho at all. If you wear it walking up a mountain in a 30 degrees Celsius summer lightning storm rain, of course it's a sauna.

If you trot through a full day of rain in the cold, it's not a sauna, but the one thing that will save you from hypothermia.
 
I've used an Altus for years. It is the best thing I've come across so far. I've tried expensive jackets and other ponchos. I can't say the Altus and me is a love affair. It is great in cold weather, but I perspire heavily and, even allowing that I can open it down the front and shrug off the sleeves, I still find myself getting wet from the inside.

I wish someone would make a breathable version of the Altus, with pit zips too! I've looked at the Packa, but it is too short imo, and possibly not roomy enough. I suppose I could buy a large, but it is expensive and I don't want to spend a lot of money on something only to find it is no better than what I have.

Currently experimenting with Froggs Toggs poncho (they are cheap). I tried to turn it into an Altus shape (using two), but failed with the sleeves. Now just trying to make the Froggs Toggs longer.

Ah, getting the perfect wet weather gear is a work that never ends...
That’s perfection for you! 🤙🏽
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I would love to get a new Altus poncho. The problem is I can't find a place to buy one in the United States or Mexico (live in Mexico). I also can't find a store in Madrid or Barcelona. I will be walking the Camino Vasco and if I get on the Camino Frances it will only be in Burgos where the Vasco ends. I will probably fly into Barcelona and make my way up to San Sebastian and then over to Bayonne to begin my camino. As I start later in the year I would like to have my poncho before I leave Bayonne. I would really like to get the Altus as it is light and I know how to get it on really easily. Does anyone know where I can buy an Altus in any of the above cites I have mentioned?
Hola IT56ny. Where in México do you live? I’ve been living in La Paz BCS for a long time…🇲🇽
 
I have one sitting in my closet that I wore only once on the Levante. Luckily that was all the rain I had in 42 days, because I would have suffered if I had had to wear it for long periods of rain. It is a very high quality poncho, great worksmanship, but…..

My oft-repeated caution about the Ferrino Trekker is that it has a metallic lining to help prevent hypothermia. If worn in winter, that could be an important feature, but what I have found is that it just makes me start sweating as soon as I put it on in spring or summer. I save it because I hope that someday I will be able to walk in winter!
I imagine that is very true P2K I generally walk February-April at the latest. 😊
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
May and June - how much rain do you expect? More to the point, do you know how hot it will get? getting into summer, hot weather is much more of a danger than cold or wet.
 
No matter what your rain gear preference is, be sure to try it out a home in a long walk in the rain. Adjust accordingly to your experience.

Do not wait until you get to Spain to try out rain or any other gear! There is no magic poncho.


-Paul
I don't always wait for a rainy day when I've needed to test rain gear. I wear it in the shower at home and it gives a good indication if it will be successful at keeping me dry.🚿
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
May and June - how much rain do you expect? More to the point, do you know how hot it will get? getting into summer, hot weather is much more of a danger than cold or wet.
This is a very good question! I don't know how much rain to expect in May/June, but I think it can vary from year to year....?
 
I don't always wait for a rainy day when I've needed to test rain gear. I wear it in the shower at home and it gives a good indication if it will be successful at keeping me dry.🚿
If I get the Altus, I'm going to have to order it from the store in SJPDP and pick up when I arrive, as they are not available in the US. I felt like it's pretty safe not to test ahead of time since I've read so many good review on it. If anyone has any cautions on the 'order ahead and pick up on arrival' for the Altus, please let me know!
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
No matter what your rain gear preference is, be sure to try it out a home in a long walk in the rain. Adjust accordingly to your experience.

Do not wait until you get to Spain to try out rain or any other gear! There is no magic poncho.


-Paul

I recently read some stuff on waterproof ratings. I think it was here in the forum. There is nothing that is is breathable and completely waterproof.
First Camino Frances In June/ July I had a Gortex jacket but it didn’t really rain much at all.
Second Camino Portuguese had some very rainy days but was warm. I had a not-very waterproof lightweight jacket and got wet but didn’t mind. I also had gaiters so boots stayed dry.
Last Camino VDLP October/November I had an umbrella, my lightweight jacket and eventually a Decathlon poncho and used in various combinations. Still wasn’t too cold while raining even in late November so legs and boots got wet but that was fine.
My Decathlon poncho got wet on the inside and at first I thought it was poor quality but then someone with an Altus said they all will eventually - either from perspiration or the rain finally getting through.
I think walking in the rain in really cold weather would be a nightmare - but given that I will probably not walk a winter Camino these days I practice not worrying so much about rain and getting wet. It might be uncomfortable but as my mother would say - are you made of sugar or something? 🤣

A good point....I may be stressing too much over which poncho to get. Your Mom is right....we won't melt!
 
I do not argue personal choices, which are a subjective thing. . . what someone likes is not arguable. Some folks like liver and onions, others hate both.

For the last decade, at least, I have found myself choosing a poncho for wet-weather walking. There are certain usability characteristics that I now prefer with ponchos. So I will point out some things that are objective considerations about the poncho. Again, there is no wrong choice because personal taste and preference is based around a huge number of variables, and every person has unique need and wants..

Altus and other similar sleeved hybrids of ponchos (rainchos?) can also share the some of the benefits of poncho use, but are generally heavier and bulkier, if that is an issue.

Ponchos that I would recommend are pretty lightweight. As an example, The Frogg Toggs when it is actually scaled, weighs around the 6 ounce mark. They can be had for $15.00 to $25.00, so that is a HUGE bargain for a highly functional piece of rain protective gear.

If I use my Zpacks poncho which is made from Dyneema (Cuben Fiber), it weighs just a bit more than 2.5 ounces and is tough as nails. I do like the Frogg Toggs a lot, though, and have used it quite a bit.

I find a poncho is more easily deployed. I can pull it out of the side pocket of my backpack and slip it on over my backpack, and I do not even have to stop. I usually do pause for the ten seconds it takes to put on, because I am becoming a bit clumsy :) I do not need to take my backpack off, put on a rain jacket, put the backpack back on.

This alone is a huge factor for me when it rains - as is often the case - it is off and on while walking. Periodic sprinkles and showers can eat up a lot of time and energy with a rain jacket IF you take it off and put it on as the immediate conditions change. There is no need to fiddle with rain covers on backpacks, and shoulder straps remain dry.

With a poncho, I can respond to conditions within seconds. I can whip off the poncho as soon as the rain has slowed or stopped, and not question "should I wait to see if it starts back up?" This helps to keep sweat condensation way down.

Air circulation and ventilation reduce condensation moisture build up, and this is helped along because of the poncho sitting over the backpack, creating air space between itself and the body.

A poncho can work equally as well, and even more flexibly, as an outer layer. The same quickness to deploy and remove a poncho works well in trying to avoid unexpected wind chill. And if the morning is cool as I start to walk, but I know I will be warm after a short walk, simply putting the poncho on for a few minutes and then whipping it off works well to avoid overheating.

On my poncho, I spend about 15 minutes after I purchase it and add a slight modification with cordage that controls flappiness and billowing during windy, stormy conditions.

On the aesthetics side, rain jackets do have the edge. . . depending on if form is a factor with regard to function.

And ponchos are great multitaskers:
  • A shelter lean-to. A bit of cord and trekking poles make it even more independent in setting up.
  • A sun shelter, it can be rigged up to provide you shade in hot climates.
  • Ground cloth: Under a tent, or a survival shelter, a poncho can protect you from the damp ground. If you are in a cold damp climate, this can help you stay warm.
  • Wind Break: A poncho without a liner will not have much insulation. However, as an outer shell, it can add an additional 10 to 20 degrees of warmth to whatever insulating layer you are wearing. You will stay warmer wearing the poncho in windy weather, helping to protect you from wind chill.
  • Privacy: A great makeshift, emergency privacy screen when needing a Nature Break where a natural coverage of bushes or tall grass is scarce. It also works when needing to change pants or shorts.
  • Sit pad. When taking a break and the ground and benches and flat rocks and logs, etc. are damp.
  • Mattress cover.
  • An emergency backpack or carryall when you do not have a small daypack.
  • A windshell to add a bit of extra warmth to clothing layers. It is great for those cool, early mornings when you need something that can be quickly removed after you have warmed up from walking.
Thanks for this, very helpful!
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
This is a very good question! I don't know how much rain to expect in May/June, but I think it can vary from year to year....?
Astorga is in Castilla y Léon, just over halfway. The chances of rain on any given day there fall from 20% May down to 5% June. Here is the website I got this information from


You will probably get some rain, but it is unlikely to be torrential or very continuous or for more than one day in succession. Take rainproof gear by all means, but you are not trekking in the Rockies, and you may find hot weather is as much of an issue as wet. Just saying.
 
I use a Fjällräven rain poncho in bright safety orange, its main feature is its breatheability, doubles as a rain/wind/night shelter..
downside: no sleeves, are open in the sides, takes wind easily, cost !
upside: specs are 5000 in and 5000 mm out in breatheability, hi viz if chozen in orange, covers rucksack (back lenght 108 cm), packs easily, weight 460gr

 
I don't always wait for a rainy day when I've needed to test rain gear. I wear it in the shower at home and it gives a good indication if it will be successful at keeping me dry.🚿

Your shower test does not test the case of walking 4-6 hours in drizzling rain. That's a lot different that a quick shower. You need to take a walk on a rainy day.


-Paul
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Your shower test does not test the case of walking 4-6 hours in drizzling rain. That's a lot different that a quick shower. You need to take a walk on a rainy day.


-Paul
I've tested rain gear while taking a long shower. I had a pretty Ikea poncho someone recommended and we had no rain expected in the near future where I live, so the shower worked great; I got wet.
Another time I'd purchased a good brand rain jacket at a resale shop. I wore it in the shower and sure enough, it leaked.
I'll stay with the trusty Frogg Toggs I've used in recent years. They aren't pretty, but they do the job.
 
I've tested rain gear while taking a long shower. I had a pretty Ikea poncho someone recommended and we had no rain expected in the near future where I live, so the shower worked great; I got wet.
Another time I'd purchased a good brand rain jacket at a resale shop. I wore it in the shower and sure enough, it leaked.
I'll stay with the trusty Frogg Toggs I've used in recent years. They aren't pretty, but they do the job.
😂 As forum members have said, the Camino ain’t no fashion show. And to paraphrase DaveBugg’s writings, whatever works for you is best for you.🤙🏽
 
I use a Fjällräven rain poncho in bright safety orange, its main feature is its breatheability, doubles as a rain/wind/night shelter..
downside: no sleeves, are open in the sides, takes wind easily, cost !
upside: specs are 5000 in and 5000 mm out in breatheability, hi viz if chozen in orange, covers rucksack (back lenght 108 cm), packs easily, weight 460gr

Thanks for the info!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Astorga is in Castilla y Léon, just over halfway. The chances of rain on any given day there fall from 20% May down to 5% June. Here is the website I got this information from


You will probably get some rain, but it is unlikely to be torrential or very continuous or for more than one day in succession. Take rainproof gear by all means, but you are not trekking in the Rockies, and you may find hot weather is as much of an issue as wet. Just saying.
Great weather website, thanks!
 
I use a Fjällräven rain poncho in bright safety orange, its main feature is its breatheability, doubles as a rain/wind/night shelter..
downside: no sleeves, are open in the sides, takes wind easily, cost !
upside: specs are 5000 in and 5000 mm out in breatheability, hi viz if chozen in orange, covers rucksack (back lenght 108 cm), packs easily, weight 460gr

The breathability adds to the advantage of air circulation in reducing interior condensation and wetness. It is one of the reasons that I like the Frogg Toggs poncho, the breathability of the fabric.
 
I just ordered a Packa http://www.thepacka.com/
after reading several folks positive reviews. It’s a combination of a rain jacket and a poncho. I’ll know more when I receive it and check it out but I think the concept is great.
I love my Packa, have used it for years. It gets a bit toasty inside so I mostly only use it in cooler weather. But it does have great pit zips for ventilation and it definitely keeps both me and my pack dry. I love how I can put it over the pack and tuck in the rest so it’s ready to slip on without having to remove the pack when it rains. I do carry a separate ultra lite pack cover though, for times when the pack is being transported. I hope you enjoy your Packa as much as I have enjoyed mine!
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
As long as you have some kind of poncho, you'll be fine. Even a large garbage bag does the job if you're desperate enough!

I've got a german brand poncho similar to the two you mentioned, about 500g weight, but no full length zipper. It's very sturdy so I don't mind the few grams extra, and it works very well. Happy I upgraded from a cheap sleeveless one to that one. Also works as another layer for warmth over the sleeping bag in cold nights, or as a picnic blanket. Love that thing.

If you intend to walk in winter, gaiters or rain pants are great combined with a good poncho, but in may/june it's unlikely you'll really need them on the Francés.

Buen Camino!
I will be walking May into June as well. Just a rain jacket with pit zips for me, plus an emergency thermal blanket that I can use as a poncho in a downpour. Has anyone tried that?
 
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I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
Anything waterproof should work.

We're happy with our (Stephenson) "Warmlite" brand ponchos made of Siliconized nylon, very light weight and with zippers on each side that extend from generous arm holes down to to the hem. They also can be sized to cover a pack, and have a system for gathering excess material when not wearing a pack.

We sewed our own rain chaps of the same material, basically loose fitting tubes (to fit over boots and for ventilation) that are beveled at the crotch with belt ties at the peak. Also very light and they work great.

The main virtue of ponchos is ventilation, as rain jackets can get as wet on the inside from condensation as on the outside from the weather, but they become a handful in wind. One might consider wrapping a belt around the waist to confine a poncho in wind, though I haven't tried it. Because they weigh so little, on some backpacking trips I carry both poncho and Siliconized nylon rain jacket.
 
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
Ponchos generally ventillate better than rain jackets. They cover the full backpack so no problem with wet shoulder straps after rain. In stonger wind use some kind of rope to prevent poncho acting like a sail. I use a Sea to Summit silnylon poncho. Strong, highly water resistant, yet weighs less than 300 grams. My poncho keeps my knees dry, so I use gaiters and skip rainpants.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Thank you all for your advice on ponchos. After reading all the input, I've decided to reserve an Altus in SJPDP. Buen Camino!
 
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
An alternative is rain jacket windstopper and telescopic umbrella. Arc'Terix and Euroschirm.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I will be walking the Camino through all of May and into June, and I have narrowed down my rain choice to one of 2 ponchos: the Altus or the Decathlon Arpenaz. I understand I can reserve an Altus in SJPDP if I decide on that one. Any thoughts on which of these is better? And second question: does anyone who has paired gaiters with a long rain poncho like Altus or Decathlon have input on how that worked?
Many thanks for your input!
Both look great - I dIdn't know you could get ponchos with sleeves!
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
If I get the Altus, I'm going to have to order it from the store in SJPDP and pick up when I arrive, as they are not available in the US. I felt like it's pretty safe not to test ahead of time since I've read so many good review on it. If anyone has any cautions on the 'order ahead and pick up on arrival' for the Altus, please let me know!
I wonder, how do you determine which size to order?
 
I wonder, how do you determine which size to order?
I was going to point you to the Caminoteca website (a store that sells the Altus in Pamplona) because they have good descriptions and recommended sizing, but the site is currently down.

You can try Googling "Caminoteca Altus Poncho" later - hopefully the site will be up and running again soon.
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I was going to point you to the Caminoteca website (a store that sells the Altus in Pamplona) because they have good descriptions and recommended sizing, but the site is currently down.

You can try Googling "Caminoteca Altus Poncho" later - hopefully the site will be up and running again soon.
Here's an earlier post that I made with a link to the Caminoteca website that you can try later.

The Caminoteca site lists the sizes and weights. You'll have to view each size to see its weight


The Medium/Large weighs 343 gm/12.1 oz
 
I was going to point you to the Caminoteca website (a store that sells the Altus in Pamplona) because they have good descriptions and recommended sizing, but the site is currently down.

You can try Googling "Caminoteca Altus Poncho" later - hopefully the site will be up and running again soon.
Thanks!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I suspect it depends very much on the type of poncho. I have a Ferrino Trekker, much like the Altus - sleeves with Velcro adjustment at wrist, full front zip (& Velcro).
I have worn it for varying lengths of time on all 7 caminos in super strong wind and very heavy rain. I have absolutely no complaints. It has kept me and my pack completely dry.
It has kept me extra warm over my sleeping bag on very cold nights in albergues with no heating and if I want to use it in the evening I just use the press studs to ‘fold up’ the ‘hunch back’ part and hey presto it’s a coat … perhaps not award winning style but still functional. 🙄
Good luck deciding. It is indeed a very personal choice. 😊
Nice suggestion to use your poncho as a layer for extra warmth in auberges. Somehow that had never occurred to me.
 
I bought a poncho on Amazon with extra room for a backpack that I love and have used on several backcountry trips since my Camino. I don't think I see the exact same one listed but have uploaded a photo of the only name I can find on it. As you can see from the photo, I chose bright orange for use during US hunting season.IMG_20230304_160111271.jpg
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
A poncho that cover backpack and body with 5000 watercoloumn protection is sufficient 98% of time on path. In other words, exellent protection level. For me…?… in my experience as a repetetive peregrino…?…this norm has become a
m i n i m u m cause rare, random and severe rainstorm with undercooled water is also to be «mastered» by all. Btw…weight «penalty» means nothing. Security and comfort means everything. Murphys law.

Ultreia🙏🏼
View attachment 142368
Wholeheartedly agree with @PilgrimPillar hat weight is nothing compared to comfort. It rained, snowed and hailed on from SJPP to Roncesvalles and I had rain jacket and pants BUT I was drenched inside from sweat. Changed out to my spare clothes at the mountain hut. I was frozen and miserable after the first hour out of SJPP.

From Negreira to Cee it rained and blew. Again, I was drenched internally.

At both times, my Camino friends who had poncho were dry, cheery and having conversation while I was miserable and withdrawn in thoughts of getting to albergue quickly for hot shower and into my sleeping bag. One ingenious person tied a string around her poncho at the waist and it stopped flapping.
 
Wholeheartedly agree with @PilgrimPillar hat weight is nothing compared to comfort. It rained, snowed and hailed on from SJPP to Roncesvalles and I had rain jacket and pants BUT I was drenched inside from sweat. Changed out to my spare clothes at the mountain hut. I was frozen and miserable after the first hour out of SJPP.

From Negreira to Cee it rained and blew. Again, I was drenched internally.

At both times, my Camino friends who had poncho were dry, cheery and having conversation while I was miserable and withdrawn in thoughts of getting to albergue quickly for hot shower and into my sleeping bag. One ingenious person tied a string around her poncho at the waist and it stopped flapping.
I think DaveBugg has good info about rain gear options. Check out his entries ⬆️.

🤙🏽
 
Wholeheartedly agree with @PilgrimPillar hat weight is nothing compared to comfort. It rained, snowed and hailed on from SJPP to Roncesvalles and I had rain jacket and pants BUT I was drenched inside from sweat. Changed out to my spare clothes at the mountain hut. I was frozen and miserable after the first hour out of SJPP.

From Negreira to Cee it rained and blew. Again, I was drenched internally.

At both times, my Camino friends who had poncho were dry, cheery and having conversation while I was miserable and withdrawn in thoughts of getting to albergue quickly for hot shower and into my sleeping bag. One ingenious person tied a string around her poncho at the waist and it stopped flapping.
So we like absolutely have differing opinions based on experience! Too funny. I think that may be the perfect example for how people should treat the advice on this forum! Either solution will work.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
I would love to get a new Altus poncho. The problem is I can't find a place to buy one in the United States or Mexico (live in Mexico). I also can't find a store in Madrid or Barcelona. I will be walking the Camino Vasco and if I get on the Camino Frances it will only be in Burgos where the Vasco ends. I will probably fly into Barcelona and make my way up to San Sebastian and then over to Bayonne to begin my camino. As I start later in the year I would like to have my poncho before I leave Bayonne. I would really like to get the Altus as it is light and I know how to get it on really easily. Does anyone know where I can buy an Altus in any of the above cites I have mentioned?
I was going to point you to the Caminoteca website (a store that sells the Altus in Pamplona) because they have good descriptions and recommended sizing, but the site is currently down.

You can try Googling "Caminoteca Altus Poncho" later - hopefully the site will be up and running again soon.
The site was working yesterday, so it must be temporary.
 
Which Poncho? NONE. They are less than desirable even in the rain. Rain pants and rain shell with rain cover for pack is way more comfortable, breathable, walkable.

Just my opinion.
They aren’t really talking about a true poncho. These are long raincoats
Rain ponchos work great if you are standing still on guard duty. If walking for hours they become portable saunas.
they aren’t really talking about a “poncho” These are long raincoats with sleeves that zip up and have a hump for a backpack. Ten Caminos and have tried all combinations, without a doubt the easiest and keeps you dry.
 
They aren’t really talking about a true poncho. These are long raincoats

they aren’t really talking about a “poncho” These are long raincoats with sleeves that zip up and have a hump for a backpack. Ten Caminos and have tried all combinations, without a doubt the easiest and keeps you dry.
Ok, I totally buy it that they might be the greatest thing ever for hiking.... but why don't I ever see them mentioned anywhere except here?
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
Ok, I totally buy it that they might be the greatest thing ever for hiking.... but why don't I ever see them mentioned anywhere except here?
I’m guessing because this site is directed at all things Camino. They are also not widely sold. I love having mine and use it off Camino. It’s super easy on and off and avoids jacket, pants and pack cover.
 
I’m guessing because this site is directed at all things Camino. They are also not widely sold. I love having mine and use it off Camino. It’s super easy on and off and avoids jacket, pants and pack cover.
That's a good answer. Buen camino. Just different strategies. I just don't like people thinking they HAVE to get pacer poles or altus ponchos.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Worked for me a few minutes ago…¿quién sabe? Ain’t technology grand…
Working for me again now too!

But just in case here's the sizing info:

The size S Altus atmospheric poncho will fit you if:

- you are shorter than 170 cm (5 feet 7 inches), and
- your backpack is smaller than 40 L, and
- your weight is under 70 kg (154,3 lbs)

The size M-L Altus atmospheric poncho will fit you if:

- you are between 170 cm (5 feet 7 inches) and 185 cm (6 feet 1 inch) tall,
- the size of your backpack is between 40 and 50 Liters
- your weight is between 70 kg (154,3 lbs) and 90 kg (198,4 lbs)

The size XL-XXL Altus atmospheric poncho will fit you if:

- you are taller than 185 cm (6 feet 1 inch),
- your backpack is bigger than 50 Liters
- your weight is over 90 kg (198,4 lbs)
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Ok so you have to be pretty tall. I think it might drag the ground for some of us.
I think that you would have to be very short or a child for it to drag on the ground
I have borrowed a friend's size small Altus, to show to some new pilgrims and to try on for size.
I'm about 5'8"/172 cm and it fit both me and my shorter friends - one barely 5 feet tall/157 cm just fine. No dragging on the ground for anyone.

I believe that @Anniesantiago, who is shorter than I am prefers the large size because it goes all the way down to her ankles.
 
Working for me again now too!

But just in case here's the sizing info:

The size S Altus atmospheric poncho will fit you if:

- you are shorter than 170 cm (5 feet 7 inches), and
- your backpack is smaller than 40 L, and
- your weight is under 70 kg (154,3 lbs)

The size M-L Altus atmospheric poncho will fit you if:

- you are between 170 cm (5 feet 7 inches) and 185 cm (6 feet 1 inch) tall,
- the size of your backpack is between 40 and 50 Liters
- your weight is between 70 kg (154,3 lbs) and 90 kg (198,4 lbs)

The size XL-XXL Altus atmospheric poncho will fit you if:

- you are taller than 185 cm (6 feet 1 inch),
- your backpack is bigger than 50 Liters
- your weight is over 90 kg (198,4 lbs)
Where besides SJPP and Pamplona can one purchase an Altus poncho? I plan to take a rain coat but am wondering if having a poncho as we near rainy Galicia might be a good idea.
 
Where besides SJPP and Pamplona can one purchase an Altus poncho? I plan to take a rain coat but am wondering if having a poncho as we near rainy Galicia might be a good idea.
That would actually be redundant. The Altus is not what we think of as a poncho. It is a long raincoat with sleeves, a zipper and a hump to accommodate a backpack. It would be used instead of raincoat, pants and pack over. It weighs about 12 oz (depending on size) which is way less than all the other items. I know they have them at the small sports store in Leon and probably is Sarria.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
The FroggToggs Ultra Light2 poncho, mentioned and 👍🏽 by many forum participants, weighs in at 9 ozs, comes in its own sac, costs $19.99 on the company website (got mine on sale at a local store for $14.99🥳), and you have your choice of 6, that’s right ladies and gentleman, 6 colors!
 
I would love to get a new Altus poncho. The problem is I can't find a place to buy one in the United States or Mexico (live in Mexico). I also can't find a store in Madrid or Barcelona. <snip>
Back in 2012, I ordered my Altus online from barrabes, and had it shipped to me in Canada. They don't list it now. It is listed at Caminoteca in Pamplona, and you might ask them about shipping it to you, via their Contact Us link.
 

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Do consider the weight of the poncho or system you will use in light of the temperatures you will be walking in.

I have walked in Feb,March, April May, Sept, Oct and Nov. on the CF. May was generally too warm for sustained wearing of Frogg Toggs. I would be soaked from sweating. They are better in cooler weather, for sure. In May, I carry a cheap 8oz poncho which I purchased from IKEA for about $8.00 years ago. I am 5’9” and it covers my head, pack, and upper body to my knees. I tie a piece of light twine around the outside of it loosely to protect flare ups from the wind…but then too it allows warmer air exits. I only use it if we are leaving early 4-5am on a really cool, rainy May morning.
Otherwise, I carry a cheap clear $1.00 plastic rain poncho for anticipated very short use. Mine do not cover my arms and nor do they cover a full pack. However, everything in my pack is sealed in plastic. Since we stay in private rooms, I prefer to empty out the pack and let it dry out. The past two years in May, I only needed to do this once.

Consider protecting your gear from the rain, but allowing yourself to get wet as an option, depending upon the temperature.
 
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Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Back in 2012, I ordered my Altus online from barrabes, and had it shipped to me in Canada.
Barrabés (a high quality outdoor store if you haven’t heard of it) stopped carrying the Altus when they discontinued their original version. The atmospheric didn’t meet their quality standards. It was a step down, IMHO.

That didn’t stop me from buying one, though! I have a great collection of ponchos, they all make me sweat, but the Altus is the lightest weight, so I stick with hit.
 
Do consider the weight of the poncho or system you will use in light of the temperatures you will be walking in.

I have walked in Feb,March, April May, Sept, Oct and Nov. on the CF. May was generally too warm for sustained wearing of Frogg Toggs. I would be soaked from sweating. They are better in cooler weather, for sure. In May, I carry a cheap 8oz poncho which I purchased from IKEA for about $8.00 years ago.

Consider protecting your gear from the rain, but allowing yourself to get wet as an option, depending upon the temperature.
I would not take my Altus in July or August, but I do take it in May. This is May 12th at Cruz de Ferro. I guess it would depend on the route and time of year.
1678030506212.jpeg
 
Back in 2012, I ordered my Altus online from barrabes, and had it shipped to me in Canada. They don't list it now. It is listed at Caminoteca in Pamplona, and you might ask them about shipping it to you, via their Contact Us link.
Thanks I love inMexico now maybe I can get it shipped to San Sebastián before I start the camino Vasco in Bayonne
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I just ordered a Packa http://www.thepacka.com/
after reading several folks positive reviews. It’s a combination of a rain jacket and a poncho. I’ll know more when I receive it and check it out but I think the concept is great.
Have used my Packa on 5 Caminos. Best feature is the ability to clamp it around your pack to carry it and then able to slip it on or off while you're walking. Great for those days with intermittent rain showers. Doesn't fly out with high winds and has excellent ventilation for warm rain. Only negative is it's not too elegant for going to dinner with so I carry a light windbreaker shell as well.
 

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