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How do you fix a stage miscalculation?

Time of past OR future Camino
Camino de Frances April 2022
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

20230410_193944.jpg

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

View attachment 144585

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
Aren’t Spreadsheets incredible…but.. now that you found that flaw… what now… I’m thinking along the same lines.. I’ll walk in October… later sunrises.. earlier subsets..shorter days, rain- maybe muddy roads… those things might effect my ability to maintain 25kms daily…I guess.. you just gotta hustle if it will push you against your departing flight— I might add two days in Santiago —so I’m not up against the wall.. thx.. for sharing/- let us know what you do.. I’d be interested in seeing how you figure it out..—maybe “skip a stage before Sarria?”
 
Aren’t Spreadsheets incredible…but.. now that you found that flaw… what now… I’m thinking along the same lines.. I’ll walk in October… later sunrises.. earlier subsets..shorter days, rain- maybe muddy roads… those things might effect my ability to maintain 25kms daily…I guess.. you just gotta hustle if it will push you against your departing flight— I might add two days in Santiago —so I’m not up against the wall.. thx.. for sharing/- let us know what you do.. I’d be interested in seeing how you figure it out..—maybe “skip a stage before Sarria?”
If I had to gain a day, I'd taxi from Leon for a stage, rather than injure myself. Im not a fan of missing stages but a flight home is not a date to miss.
I always work out roughly how many days I need (I never spreadsheet) and add in a few more for good measure, then I can continue to Fisterra if time permits, or take a rest day or two. A couple of contingency days is always a good idea.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading Abbey to Southampton, 110 kms
I am certainly a planner and spreadsheet person as I do like, especially over the winter, visualising/checking and rereading previous walks (and watching The Way again!). If I need/plan to walk 40k in a day then I walk 4 lots of roughly 10k. i.e. start early, stop for a rest after c. 10k, take off rucksack, have a drink, and a chat. However, I will have booked accommodation at the end of the day so there is no rush - just "plod" along taking in the scenery. Whilst I am 75 I do walk about 10 miles every day so my legs/feet are used to going one step at a time until reaching the end without complaining.
 
Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading Abbey to Southampton, 110 kms
Well, we are all unique human beings with their own likings.
I understand that for some, it gives comfort to have a detailed plan on what they are going to do at what day in which town.
For me, camino is a lot about freedom and choice. Walk, eat, sleep, repeat, that's the only certain thing. Everything else, i love deciding in the moment. Do I stop early because for whatever reason i want to, i do it, do i want to walk 40km a day, i do it. I did rest on days i did not plan and i did walk on days i planned on resting. Only thing i had, was a return date which gave me some flexibility. Unfortunately, i arrived a day late for walking to Fisterra, so i took the bus, had two great days and returned home.
(And yes, i am aware that i am maybe younger or in better shape or that being from Europe adds to my flexibility. I think there is no shame in utilizing this)
 
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

View attachment 144585

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
Biggest lesson is don't do a day by day plan! The Camino Frances is so well resourced that almost anyone can choose their destination that day, as they walk.

Second lesson is to add on 4-5 days onto any expected finish date. If you don't need the extra days at the end then there are plenty of other things to do in Spain and most don't cost a lot.
 
Once, long ago in the time before we made spreadsheets I made a similar miscalculation which led me to walk from Astorga to Ponferrada. It was the most fun I never want to have again.
I similarly undercounted the number of days I needed from Leon to Santiago, by one day. I didn't do much planning - only saw Gronze at the recommendation of some helpful pilgrims in St Martin after Leon. I initially thought to walk slightly longer days. Then suffered foot problems, maybe plantar fasciitis, so scratched that plan. As it happened, accommodation was totally full at both O Cebreiro and Portomarin, so I had to taxi/bus ahead, and that solved my non-planning. I do regret ending up ahead of the helpful people I met in the first week though.
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
I printed a spreadsheet in 2014, left one copy under a magnet on the refrigerator door for my wife and one in my pack. I veered off of the master plan on day #3 and that hardcopy didn't see the light of day until I was back in Virginia almost two months later. Spontaneity and flexibility -- even lighter than a spreadsheet and way more fun.
 
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I am typically a planner, but on the Camino planning was limited to getting to the start line and next day accommodation. The thing I enjoyed most was having no no idea what was around the next corner, where I’d stay, or who I’d meet there. So freeing.
 
Where is the fun in over planning,
OMG, that is a prolonged part of the fun. Planning & savoring before you go. 👀 at all the different guides and apps, over and over and even google walking some of it. To paraphrase a well known phrase, so many Caminos/steps so little time. Watching all your plans “go belly up” once you arrive and having to do it on the run. Priceless!
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
OMG, that is a prolonged part of the fun. Planning & savoring before you go. 👀 at all the different guides and apps, over and over and even google walking some of it. To paraphrase a well known phrase, so many Caminos/steps so little time. Watching all your plans “go belly up” once you arrive and having to do it on the run. Priceless!
No plan survives first contact with the enemy. 😄
 
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

View attachment 144585

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
I had a simple spreadsheet for last year on my iPad mini, adjusted it as my plans and distances changed.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

View attachment 144585

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
The expectations that go along with over-planning are a great way to have a disappointing Camino. Although I understand some folks have a type of personality that requires feeling in control of everything, in all the Caminos I’ve done, more than a bare bones plan for a day or 2 ahead has always made me feel like I missed out on something else I might have enjoyed more. But I’m comfortable winging it, and many people are not.
 
Where is the fun in over planning, be spontaneous, just wing it.

I make a spreadsheet with my proposed stops and distances with columns to fill out along the way with where I actually stopped. Rarely are they the same.

Second lesson is to add on 4-5 days onto any expected finish date.
At least 4 - 5 days extra!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
The expectations that go along with over-planning are a great way to have a disappointing Camino. Although I understand some folks have a type of personality that requires feeling in control of everything,

Just to clarify- some people plan to regulate fear and that’s a good strategy; some plan through need eg physical needs; and others plan just for the joy and pleasure of creating a plan, knowing that it may or may not reflect future experiences.
Hooray to all the planners. ❤️❤️❤️
And hooray to all the non-planners ❤️❤️❤️
Me - I love planning but somehow have no drive/desire to plan my Caminos above a basic level. Interesting.
 
One of the reasons I plan is to make sure that I have allowed myself enough time to complete my Camino.
On a long distance walk I usually average about 30km per day. I generally just divide the total distance by 30 and add a few days to give me some slack. Not booking my return travel until the end is nearly in sight helps too!
 
A Treasure Trove Of Interesting Pilgrim Hacks! Learn & Share Your Own Too!
The expectations that go along with over-planning are a great way to have a disappointing Camino. Although I understand some folks have a type of personality that requires feeling in control of everything,
Since when is studying a subject a bad thing?

Much of what we choose to put in our spreadsheets is not there so we can be "in control of everything." It is there because we might find it interesting and/or helpful at some point. The plan may still be very loose. In fact, having the facts gathered in advance can allow us to make unplanned decisions on the fly.

Some of us enjoy studying and learning about the place we are planning to visit. Rarely have I found that having such knowledge leads to disappointment.

Please don't label me as a control freak or rigid, or incapable of smelling roses. Let me enjoy knowing the names and growth habits of the roses I smell when I walk. 🌹
 
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

View attachment 144585

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
Oh that brought back some not so pleasant memories!

We did the same thing - miscalculated - and had to push the distance to the max (for us) in the last five days, which wasn't helped by another miscalculation in a guidebook on the distance from Samos to the alberque we had reserved. It would have been much better to have dropped our last rest day and taken things easier.

We made it to Santiago on time but in pain and too tired to enjoy the places we stayed along the way. Not enough to spoil the trip but enough to say "never again" to multiple 30km days.

So yes! Double check your stages early and often if you have a flight home to catch!!!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
I have told this story before, but I think it worth repeating from time to time.

On my second Camino, I met a very skilled surgeon from the United States who was a complete and total perfectionist. In planning his Camino, he read hundreds of books, consulted maps, poured over elevation charts, and looked up historical weather data. He left nothing to chance. The invasion of Normandy took less planning. He was so precise that he prebooked a room for every night of the Camino--some 40 carefully planned out reservations. In all, he spent almost a thousand hours planning out the perfect Camino. The most absolutely glorious, never been done before, perfect Camino. It was a piece of artwork that rivaled the David or the Mona Lisa.

Then his Camino started.

On the first day he fell in with a Camino family. He loved his Camino family, and they loved him. But there was one problem. His Camino family was being spontaneous. They were living in the moment. As a result, they would not decide on where to spend the night until mid-afternoon at the earliest. Rarely did his Camino family stop in the same village where he had a reservation.

His solution? He would stop where his Camino family stopped, have a beer with them, grab a taxi, rush forward/backward to the village where he had his room, check in, shower, change clothes, grab a taxi back to his Camino family, have dinner with them, grab a taxi back to his room, sleep, grab a taxi back to his Camino family, and resume walking with them. I observed this odd behavior all the way from SJPP to Leon.

Finally, one day I asked him, "Why don't you just cancel the remainder of your reservations and stay in the same village as your Camino family?" Before he responded, he looked left, looked right, and then leaned in towards me to make sure no one could hear him before he whispered, "I don't want to admit that being a perfectionist about my Camino was a complete and total waste of my time."
 
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Spreadsheets can be really useful where trains and buses are concerned. You can't really wing it where transit visas, two trains a week, and un-changeable bookings are involved for a two month trip, where some of the train journeys last for a week. At least, not much 🤔. But a walk along the Camino Frances, yes, you can. If your traveling companion has four hooves and a free spirit then you don't have a choice anyway. So, if you feel the need to book, by all means do so. It doesn't have to be more than a day in advance, and the worst thing that will happen is you end up sleeping somewhere less than ideal.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I had a quick look over the comments, I could not find the word FUN. Oh I plan each day dont get me wrong.....I wake, I smile, I go outside talk to the first person I see, find a coffee and walk when tired I stop turn around look where I have just come from feel great and then walk some more, see a nice place eat put head down and then repeat....hey I am in Santiago.
 
Know thy self! We would not be physically prepared to walk a 40km, 35km and then 32km consecutively and expect to continue without any significant consequences. So we would seek public transport. Better to walk into SdC then to fly home early.
 
I found that it is best to consider PLAN is a verb and not a noun.
Or a plan is not a promise. I like to start my Caminos with as much planning and as little commitment as possible. I like to do the research and make the plans, but hold them in an open hand rather than a closed fist. That way, I have the most possible information to make the decision in the moment - what I have researched before and what I have discovered since.
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Spreadsheets can be really useful where trains and buses are concerned. You can't really wing it where transit visas, two trains a week, and un-changeable bookings are involved for a two month trip, where some of the train journeys last for a week. At least, not much 🤔. But a walk along the Camino Frances, yes, you can. If your traveling companion has four hooves and a free spirit then you don't have a choice anyway. So, if you feel the need to book, by all means do so. It doesn't have to be more than a day in advance, and the worst thing that will happen is you end up sleeping somewhere less than ideal.
It depends on how you do your train travelling. When I was much, much younger I had a three-month Eurailpass. I had it all planned out and I will never forget the feeling when, in Austria, I threw all my plans out the window (figuratively) to head up to Scandinavia to see the midnight sun. It was a very freeing feeling.
 
It depends on how you do your train travelling. When I was much, much younger I had a three-month Eurailpass. I had it all planned out and I will never forget the feeling when, in Austria, I threw all my plans out the window (figuratively) to head up to Scandinavia to see the midnight sun. It was a very freeing feeling.
Visas.... Which cost as much as the train fares, near enough.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Yep, the one I had in mind was Montmorillon to Hsipaw and then a couple of weeks in Thailand. Had to go to the Russian Embassy in London for one which involved fingerprints, which as I live in France was a major pain. Others got done by an agent while I waited in Shropshire to get my passport back and go home.
 
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

View attachment 144585

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
Spreadsheets are great only if they allow some flexibility and spontaneity
 
A Treasure Trove Of Interesting Pilgrim Hacks! Learn & Share Your Own Too!
I love to plan and do spreadsheets, but I need to be spontaneous. Partway through my first Camino, I realized I hadn't been following my spreadsheets - spontaneity had taken over. I still plan and do spreadsheets, but don't take them with me anymore. Sometimes I've had to adjust my plans for getting home, but that's ok - it's part of my Camino, and it always works out - with added adventures... Being a little old lady with white hair helps... 🤭😇
 
Spreadsheets are great only if they allow some flexibility and spontaneity
Spreadsheets are fine! They really depend upon what one puts in/on them. They actually can help you determine what choices might be available, offering you more flexibility! Spontaneity one can always access (if their personality allows).
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
In planning my Camino Frances pilgrimage in 2022 I discovered folks on this forum who were preparing spreadsheets for the trip and even asking advice regarding their plans. I thought to myself, not a bad idea, especially since I don’t want to strictly follow published stages. So I built a spreadsheet with details on distances, albergues that received shells from A Selection of Favorite Albergues by atilburg1@chello.nl or a heart from Brierley, and interesting sites to visit. I embedded formulas to automatically recalculate days and distances as I made changes over the months of preparation. I even added contingency paths, in case I traveled less in the first days or made a side trip. I built in an ‘extra day’. I checked and double checked. Pretty smart. What could go wrong?

About half way, in Carrion de los Condes, I discovered a previously undetected flaw in my spreadsheet. I was a day short to reach Santiago! Aaaarrgghh! Not so smart.

Extending the pilgrimage with a changed international flight home to Canada was not a viable option. Either I had to give up a future planned rest day or catch up by skipping a stage using transit or taxi. Gabi, an Israeli woman, suggested an alternative: she planned to get to Leon in 3 days instead of the typical 4 from the point at which we were gathered drinking café con leches with a large gaggle of pilgrims. It would entail days of 40, 35, and 32 kms respectively. It was her plan. Surely, I thought, I can pull this off too! I had already walked 18 kms by 10:30 am that day. (never mind that I am 61 and she is 25)

That first day of 40 km nearly finished me off, as I collapsed into the Monestario de Santa Cruz in Sahagun at 5:30 pm, my latest arrival ever. I attach a drawing of my feet cooling off in the middle of the day.

View attachment 144585

The next day of 35 km resulted in painful shins the final 5 km. Suffering seemed to be de rigour for the journey. I made it to Leon a day ahead of schedule!. I had dinner with Gabi and other assorted pilgrims in Leon. She made it also! But not by walking. She got tendonitis and took a bus. The doctor told her to quit and fly home. She wasn’t discouraged at all. Happy to come back next year and finish.

There are some lessons here.

I tucked the spreadsheet into the bottom of my pack. John Brierley’s guide, social connections, and physical reconnaissance would suffice for the remaining days.
Too late for you now but we hired bikes in Burgos and are dropping them off in Leon - you can save anything up to 5 days with this plan - but you need to discover the problem before Burgos!😩
 
I think the bad idea was the desire to return to the schedule by Leon. Why? Carrion de Los Condes means you are half way down the road, that you have 400 k and two weeks to go. All you have to do is to gain what ? 20-25 k in two weeks? No big deal. If you like planning then see where there are shorter stages, or where you have an albergue just few k ahead. Gaining 25 k in 15 days every body can do it, but walk in 3 days 4 stages this is not for everybody.
Buen Camino
Brandy
 
I just found this in my file of good things to think about - from Agatha Christie... - sorry, I don't remember the source...

Life seems to me to consist of three
parts: the absorbing and usually
enjoyable present which rushes on from
minute to minute with fatal speed; the
future, dim and uncertain, for which one
can make any number of interesting
plans, the wilder and more improbable
the better, since - as nothing will turn out
as you expect it to do - you might as well
have the fun of planning anyway; and
thirdly, the past, the memories and
realities that are the bedrock of one's
present life, brought back suddenly by a
scent, the shape of a hill, an old song-
some triviality that makes one suddenly
say 'I remember...' with a peculiar and
quite unexplainable pleasure.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I just started walking. No plan whatever. Stopped when I got tired, got going when I woke up.
 
I've enjoyed a little planning. I don't see any mention of the Camino Pilgrim app. I've been able to basically plan my Camino, while still staying flexible. It's just a good guide for whether I'm going to get to Santiago in the month I've got. I'm not determined to get anywhere by a certain time, but if I check in and realise I'm a little fast/slow I can adjust, or taxi the 20ish km. So satisfying planning, but not ridged.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
I think the bad idea was the desire to return to the schedule by Leon. Why? Carrion de Los Condes means you are half way down the road, that you have 400 k and two weeks to go. All you have to do is to gain what ? 20-25 k in two weeks? No big deal. If you like planning then see where there are shorter stages, or where you have an albergue just few k ahead. Gaining 25 k in 15 days every body can do it, but walk in 3 days 4 stages this is not for everybody.
Buen Camino
Brandy
yes, indeed, but I have no regrets. Surprisingly, neither did Gabi, who had to fly home. I now have a record 40 km in one day. But never to be repeated.
 

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